FEATURED POST

In the crosshairs of conscience: John Kitzhaber's death penalty reckoning

Image
To cope with his dread, John Kitzhaber opened his leather-bound journal and began to write.
It was a little past 9 on the morning of Nov. 22, 2011. Gary Haugen had dropped his appeals. A Marion County judge had signed the murderer's death warrant, leaving Kitzhaber, a former emergency room doctor, to decide Haugen's fate. The 49-year-old would soon die by lethal injection if the governor didn't intervene.
Kitzhaber was exhausted, having been unable to sleep the night before, but he needed to call the families of Haugen's victims.
"I know my decision will delay the closure they need and deserve," he wrote.
The son of University of Oregon English professors, Kitzhaber began writing each day in his journal in the early 1970s. The practice helped him organize his thoughts and, on that particular morning, gather his courage.
Kitzhaber first dialed the widow of David Polin, an inmate Haugen beat and stabbed to death in 2003 while already serving a life sentence fo…

Malaysian woman charged with murdering domestic worker, faces the death penalty

Domestic worker
A Malaysian woman was charged Wednesday with the murder of an Indonesian domestic worker who was found with wounds covering her body and was allegedly forced to sleep outside with a dog.

M. A. Ambika, 60, will be sentenced to death if found guilty of murdering Adelina Sau, in a case that has sparked new tensions between Jakarta and Kuala Lumpur over a long-standing flashpoint issue.

About 2.5 million Indonesians work in neighboring Malaysia — both legally and illegally — including many as domestic workers, but there have been repeated cases of abuse over the years.

The victim, in her 20s, died at a Malaysian hospital this month, a day after being rescued by a migrant workers’ protection group.

Her head and face were swollen and she had wounds on her hands and legs. A Malaysian lawmaker said she had been forced to sleep on a porch next to a dog.

Ambika was charged during an appearance at the magistrate’s court in the northern town of Bukit Mertajam with the murder of the domestic worker at her home on February 10, state news agency Bernama reported.

She did not enter a plea, the agency said. A murder conviction carries a mandatory death sentence in Malaysia.

Her daughter, R. Jayavartiny, 32, was charged with employing the victim despite being aware she did not have a valid work permit. She denied the charge.

Local media reported Ambika’s son, who was also initially arrested after the helper’s death, will appear as a witness in the case.

Two people have also been arrested in Indonesia on human trafficking charges in connection with the death of the domestic worker, with police alleging they used forged documents to send the victim to Malaysia.

Indonesia is reportedly considering reinstating a ban on sending domestic workers to Malaysia following the case. Jakarta last imposed a ban in 2009 to 2011.

Malaysia’s Deputy Prime Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi has urged Jakarta not to go ahead with the ban, insisting recently employers who abuse domestic workers will be brought to justice.

“The Malaysian government will never protect any employer who is found to have acted cruelly,” he said.

Source: Agence France-Presse, February 21, 2018


Father in Malaysia charged with murder of baby girl


A young father in Malaysia was charged on Wednesday (Feb 21) with the murder of his 1 1/2-month-old baby girl last week.

Muhamad Firdaus Saidon, 22, allegedly caused the death of his daughter, Nurul Ain Umairah Muhammad, at their house in Bukit Tengah at 10.45am last Thursday.

Nurul is said to have died following suspected abuse, and a post-mortem revealed that she had a severe brain haemorrhage and multiple injuries on her body.

The baby girl, who was born on Dec 30 last year, died while on the way to hospital, the Star Online reported, adding that she had bruises and abrasion marks all over her body and bite marks on her arms.

There were also signs that her ribs and right arm had been fractured, and that her left hip also showed signs of recent fracture, said the report, adding that the baby's injuries were believed to have been caused by blunt objects.

Her father, a lorry driver, merely nodded in understanding when the charge was read to him before magistrate Muhamad Anas Mahadzir. No plea was recorded.

His 22-year-old wife, who had been arrested with him, has been released on police bond and will appear as a witness during the trial, the New Straits Times reported.

The charge, under Section 302 of Malaysia's Penal Code, carries a mandatory death penalty upon conviction.

The case will be heard again on Apr 19. Chemical and post-mortem reports will also be submitted then.

Source: channelnewsasia.com, February 22, 2018


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

New Hampshire: More than 50,000 anti-death penalty signatures delivered to Sununu

Texas: The accused Santa Fe shooter will never get the death penalty. Here’s why.

Convicted killer from infamous “Texas 7” prison escape gets execution date

Malaysian court sentences Australian grandmother to death by hanging

Post Mortem – the execution of Edward Earl Johnson

Ohio: Lawyers seek review of death sentence for 23-year-old Clayton man

Texas man on death row for decapitating 3 kids loses appeal

Amnesty International Once Again Highlights Shocking Justice System in Iran

Maria Exposto: Can she avoid execution?

Ohio man with execution set for July 18 blames killing on ‘homosexual panic’