FEATURED POST

Anthony Ray Hinton Spent Almost 30 Years on Death Row. Now He Has a Message for White America.

Image
Anthony Ray Hinton was mowing the lawn at his mother's house in 1985 when Alabama police came to arrest him for 2 murders he did not commit. One took place when he was working the night shift at a Birmingham warehouse. Yet the state won a death sentence, based on 2 bullets it falsely claimed matched a gun found at his mother's home. In his powerful new memoir, "The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row," Hinton describes how racism and a system stacked against the poor were the driving forces behind his conviction. He also writes about the unique and unexpected bonds that can form on death row, and in particular about his relationship with Henry Hays, a former Klansman sentenced to death for a notorious lynching in 1981. Hays died in the electric chair in 1997 - 1 of 54 people executed in Alabama while Hinton was on death row.
After almost 30 years, Hinton was finally exonerated in 2015, thanks to the Equal Justice Initiative, or EJI. On April 27…

Indonesia Drug Czar Warns Methamphetamine Seizures Tip of Iceberg

BNN Indonesia
Jakarta. Indonesia is probably only stopping a fraction of what could be hundreds of tons of methamphetamine flooding in from countries such as China, even after a record seizure this month, its anti-narcotics czar said.

President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo last week told law enforcement officers to shoot drug traffickers if they resist arrest to deal with a narcotics emergency facing the archipelago of over 17,000 islands.

"We have became a good spot for drug dealers, because it's easy to infiltrate by the sea. There are so many unofficial landing points and small ports, also many islands," National Narcotics Agency (BNN) chief Comr. Gen. Budi Waseso said in an interview.

Budi said he believed that 72 international drug syndicates were operating in Indonesia.

The drugs chief said Indonesia would not replicate the bloody war on drugs in the Philippines under President Rodrigo Duterte, in which hundreds have been killed, though he praised its aims.

"I never say that we have to follow the Philippines. We have our own laws," said Budi. "I have to say, though, that Duterte's policy shows he is taking care of his citizens."

Budi said there was evidence of syndicates re-directing shipments of methamphetamine, known as "shabu" in Southeast Asia, towards Indonesia because of the crackdown in the Philippines.

Kill Drug Dealers


The drugs chief denied there had been any pressure from above to go outside the law to kill drug dealers, and said a recent series of shootings by police of dealers during arrests was due to greater resistance and better armed traffickers.

President Jokowi's comments on shooting dealers came a week after police shot dead a Taiwanese man in a town near the capital Jakarta. Police said the man was part of a group trying to smuggle a record one ton of crystal methamphetamine into Indonesia and was killed for resisting arrest.

Budi said China was by far the biggest supplier of methamphetamine to Indonesia. Citing official data from China's National Narcotics Control Commission, he said 250 tons of the drug were estimated to have been directed to Indonesia in 2016, while his agency only seized only 3.4 tons.

"Whereas shabu is exported not only from China, but from India, Pakistan, Africa, European countries etc. So it must be even more than 250 tons," Budi said.

He said while data in Indonesia was never fully accurate, the number of drug abusers in the country could be 6.4 million, based on a 2016 University of Indonesia survey.

"If one person consumes around one gram per week, it means they need 300 tons per year of shabu," he said.

To meet the threat, Budi said he was trying to obtain better weapons for officers. He said the drug syndicates, in addition to having better arms, also had anti-wiretapping devices.

Known at times for his offbeat ideas, Budi repeated a suggestion that drug traffickers could be locked up on a prison island guarded by crocodiles to prevent dealers bribing the guards.

"You think crocodiles can be bribed? Of course not," he said, adding that piranhas could be an alternative.

Budi also said it might better to put drug addicts on remote islands where they could live off the land and the sea would be the barrier to escape.

"Only in this situation, I think they'll forget about narcotics, because in their mind they will only think about how to get food," he said.

Source: Jakarta Globe, Reuters, July 28, 2017

⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

New Hampshire Governor Vetoes Death Penalty Repeal

Las Vegas judge signs Scott Dozier’s execution warrant

Anthony Ray Hinton Spent Almost 30 Years on Death Row. Now He Has a Message for White America.

Thailand carries out first execution since 2009

Thailand: Resuming Death Penalty a Major Setback

Texas assures court it can carry out aging death row inmate's execution

Texas executes Dale Devon Scheanette

Nebraska: Court orders correction department to release execution drug information

Thailand: 2nd suspect hunted in wake of Monday's execution