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No Second Chances: What to Do After a Botched Execution

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Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. The state shouldn't get a second chance.
The pathos and problems of America's death penalty were vividly on display yesterday when Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. Immediately after its failure Gov. John Kasich set June 5, 2019, as a new execution date.
This plan for a second execution reveals a glaring inadequacy in the legal standards governing botched executions in the United States.
Campbell was tried and sentenced to die for murdering 18-year-old Charles Dials during a carjacking in 1997. After Campbell exhausted his legal appeals, he was denied clemency by the state parole board and the governor.
By the time the state got around to executing Campbell, he was far from the dangerous criminal of 20 years ago. As is the case with many of America's death-row inmates, the passage of time had inflicted its own punishments.
The inmate Ohio strapped onto the gurney was a 69-year-old man afflicted with serious ailm…

India's New Anti-Hijacking Law, Prescribing Capital Punishment For Death Of 'Any Person', Comes Into Force

Air India
In the new law, the definition has been expanded to include the death of "security personnel on board" or "ground support staff" as well.

NEW DELHI -- The country's new anti-hijacking law, which prescribes capital punishment in the event of death of "any person", has come into force following a government notification.

The 2016 Anti-Hijacking Act replaces a 1982-vintage law, according to which hijackers could be tried for death penalty only in the event of death of hostages, such as flight crew, passengers and security personnel.

In the new law, the definition has been expanded to include the death of "security personnel on board" or "ground support staff" as well.

In other cases of hijacking, guilty will be punished with imprisonment for life and fine, besides confiscation of movable and immovable property held by him or her.

The new law, which has come into effect after its notification on July 5, includes several acts within the definition of hijacking including making a threat, attempts or abetment to commit the offence.

Those who organize or direct others to commit such offence will also be considered to have committed the offence of hijacking.

The new law mandates the central government to confer powers of investigation, arrest and prosecution on any officer of the central government or National Investigation Agency (NIA).

A bill to repeal 1982's Anti-Hijacking Act in this regard was introduced in Rajya Sabha by Civil Aviation Minister Ashok Gajapathi Raju on December 17, 2014.

After a few days, it was referred to a parliamentary panel which gave its report in March 2015. 

The bill was passed on May 4, 2016 in the Upper House, and on May 9, 2016 in the Lok Sabha.

Source: HuffPost India, July 7, 2017

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