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Will the U.S. Finally End the Death Penalty?

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In the past, abolition efforts have faced a backlash—but Gavin Newsom’s moratorium may be different.
The American death penalty is extraordinarily fragile, with death sentences and executions on the decline. Public support for the death penalty has diminished. The practice is increasingly marginalized around the world. California, with its disproportionately large share of American death-row inmates, announces an end to the death penalty. The year? 1972. That’s when the California Supreme Court declared the death penalty inconsistent with the state’s constitutional prohibition of cruel or unusual punishments—only to have the death penalty restored a year later through popular initiative and legislation.
On Wednesday, again, California walked back its commitment to the death penalty. Though not full-fledged abolition, Governor Gavin Newsom declared a moratorium on capital punishment lasting as long as his tenure in office, insisting that the California death penalty has been an “abject…

India's New Anti-Hijacking Law, Prescribing Capital Punishment For Death Of 'Any Person', Comes Into Force

Air India
In the new law, the definition has been expanded to include the death of "security personnel on board" or "ground support staff" as well.

NEW DELHI -- The country's new anti-hijacking law, which prescribes capital punishment in the event of death of "any person", has come into force following a government notification.

The 2016 Anti-Hijacking Act replaces a 1982-vintage law, according to which hijackers could be tried for death penalty only in the event of death of hostages, such as flight crew, passengers and security personnel.

In the new law, the definition has been expanded to include the death of "security personnel on board" or "ground support staff" as well.

In other cases of hijacking, guilty will be punished with imprisonment for life and fine, besides confiscation of movable and immovable property held by him or her.

The new law, which has come into effect after its notification on July 5, includes several acts within the definition of hijacking including making a threat, attempts or abetment to commit the offence.

Those who organize or direct others to commit such offence will also be considered to have committed the offence of hijacking.

The new law mandates the central government to confer powers of investigation, arrest and prosecution on any officer of the central government or National Investigation Agency (NIA).

A bill to repeal 1982's Anti-Hijacking Act in this regard was introduced in Rajya Sabha by Civil Aviation Minister Ashok Gajapathi Raju on December 17, 2014.

After a few days, it was referred to a parliamentary panel which gave its report in March 2015. 

The bill was passed on May 4, 2016 in the Upper House, and on May 9, 2016 in the Lok Sabha.

Source: HuffPost India, July 7, 2017

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Will the U.S. Finally End the Death Penalty?