FEATURED POST

This is America: 9 out of 10 public schools now hold mass shooting drills for students

Image
How "active shooter" drills became normal for a generation of American schoolchildren.
"Are you kids good at running and screaming?" a police officer asks a class of elementary school kids in Akron, Ohio.
His friendly tone then turns serious.
“What I don’t want you to do is hide in the corner if a bad guy comes in the room,” he says. "You gotta get moving."
This training session — shared online by the ALICE Training Institute, a civilian safety training company — reflects the new normal at American public schools. As armed shooters continue their deadly rampages, and while Washington remains stuck on gun control, a new generation of American students have learned to lock and barricade their classroom doors the same way they learn to drop and roll in case of a fire.
The training session is a stark reminder of how American schools have changed since the 1999 Columbine school shooting. School administrators and state lawmakers have realized that a mass shoot…

Nebraska Steps Closer to Executing Prisoners

Nebraska inched closer to executing prisoners, as its governor signed off on a new execution protocol with fewer confidentiality protections for manufacturers of lethal injection drugs.

"Finalizing the protocol will help carry out the will of the people of Nebraska in regards to the death penalty," Gov. Pete Ricketts said in a statement about the Jan. 26 Execution Protocol.

Ricketts signed the protocol and delivered it to Secretary of State John Gale to file and make it official. Both are Republicans.

Ricketts' approval came four weeks after a public hearing in Lincoln to take comments. 20 people spoke, all but 2 of them with misgivings, particularly about measures to keep the identity of drug suppliers secret.

Whether due to public pressure or legitimate legal concerns, the updated protocol removed stipulations to hide the identities of those who supply lethal drugs to the state.

Danielle Conrad, executive director of the ACLU of Nebraska called it a win for open government.

"This is a victory for the thousands of Nebraskans who spoke out and opposed this misguided policy that attempted to shroud the death penalty in a cloak of secrecy," Conrad said in an interview.

The secrecy provision was seen as a crucial element to the new protocol, as no domestic pharmaceutical firms will produce execution drugs and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has banned their importation.

With this in mind, state Senator John Kuehn, a Republican rancher from Heartwell, introduced legislation that would guarantee confidentiality for providers of lethal injection drugs.

It is not clear how the changes to the protocol made by corrections officials might influence his bill, LB 661, but Kuehn has said he intends to pursue passage of the bill regardless.

Previous protocols required 3 drugs - sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide and potassium chloride - to be administered in precise order and dosage.

The new protocol removes restrictions on what drugs corrections officials can use, provided that "the substance or substances can be intravenously injected in a quantity sufficient to cause death without the unnecessary and wanton infliction of pain," according to guidelines issued by corrections director Scott R. Frakes.

Frakes' office declined to comment for this article.

Once the revised protocol is made official, a formality at this point, the secretary of state can ask the state supreme court to set an execution date for 1 of the 10 prisoners on Nebraska's death row.

That would be just 1 more step in what promises to be a protracted legal battle to test the validity of the state's new protocols.

Back in November, the ACLU vowed to continue the fight against the state's effort to clear its death row backlog - it's been nearly 20 years since Nebraska performed an execution.

ACLU director Conrad said much of the battle lies ahead.

"The death penalty remains a failed government program that is broken beyond repair. There are no quick fixes or easy answers when the state tinkers with the machinery of death," she said.

60 % of Nebraska voters approved Referendum 426 in November, to restore the death penalty.

Source: Courthouse News, January 30, 2017


Death penalty protocol signed, sealed and delivered by Governor Ricketts


On Thursday Governor Pete Ricketts signed the protocol for carrying out death penalty sentences in Nebraska.

Governor Rickets delivered the protocol to Secretary of State, John Gale saying, "The Department of Corrections was responsive to feedback provided in the public hearing".

He also said that finalizing the protocol would help carry out the will of the people of Nebraska in regards to the death penalty.

Governor Rickett's final protocol to carry out death penalty sentences will be available on the Secretary of State's website.

Source: nebraska.tv, January 30, 2017

⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!

Most Viewed (Last 30 Days)

Florida: Emilia Carr resentenced to life in prison

British grandmother Lindsay Sandiford on death row in Bali faces losing last-ditch appeal

Texas: Supreme Court rejects Larry Swearingen's plea for DNA testing

Capital Punishment and Extreme Mental Torture

New Mexico: Swift end for House bill to reinstate death penalty

Iran Executed Three Juvenile Offenders in January

Indiana: Marcus Dansby's death penalty case rescheduled for spring of 2019

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

Nevada Inmate Serving 2 Life Terms Dead at Age 83, Decades After SCOTUS Overturned His Death Sentence

Iran: Authorities execute young man in exceptionally cruel circumstances