FEATURED POST

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Image
The fire moved quickly through the house, a one-story wood-frame structure in a working-class neighborhood of Corsicana, in northeast Texas. Flames spread along the walls, bursting through doorways, blistering paint and tiles and furniture. Smoke pressed against the ceiling, then banked downward, seeping into each room and through crevices in the windows, staining the morning sky.
Buffie Barbee, who was eleven years old and lived two houses down, was playing in her back yard when she smelled the smoke. She ran inside and told her mother, Diane, and they hurried up the street; that’s when they saw the smoldering house and Cameron Todd Willingham standing on the front porch, wearing only a pair of jeans, his chest blackened with soot, his hair and eyelids singed. He was screaming, “My babies are burning up!” His children—Karmon and Kameron, who were one-year-old twin girls, and two-year-old Amber—were trapped inside.
Willingham told the Barbees to call the Fire Department, and while Dia…

Saudi Arabia to behead disabled man for protesting

Public beheading in Saudi Arabia
Public beheading in Saudi Arabia
Munir al-Adam says he signed a confession only after being beaten so badly he lost hearing in one ear


A specialised criminal court in Riyadh, the Arab kingdom's capital, sentenced Munir al-Adam, to death for "attacks on police" and other offences they said took place during protests in the Shia-dominated east in late 2011.

The 23-year-old is partially blind and was already partially deaf at the time of arrest; he alleges he is now completely deaf in one ear as a result of being severely beaten by police.

His family issued a statement rejecting the verdict and claiming that Mr Adam was tortured into confessing, The Times reported.

The steel cable worker said he had only signed a document admitting the offences after being repeatedly beaten. He said he had been accused of "sending texts" when he was too poor to own a mobile phone.

47 protesters and alleged supporters of al-Qaeda were executed in a single day in January. In July, the number of beheadings in Saudi Arabia reached 108 this year, putting the country, which has a population of nearly 29 million people, on track to exceed its 2015 execution total.

Saudi Arabia is one of the world's most prolific executioners. Research last year by human rights organisation Reprieve found that, of those identified as facing execution in Saudi Arabia, some 72 per cent were sentenced to death for non-violent alleged crimes, while torture and forced confessions were common.

"Munir Adam's appalling case illustrates how the Saudi authorities are all too happy to subject the most vulnerable people to the swordsman's blade," said Maya Foa, of Reprieve. "Saudi Arabia's close allies, including the UK, must urge the kingdom to release Munir, along with juveniles and others who were sentenced to death for protesting."

The traditionally close relationship between Saudi Arabia and Britain has become strained in the past year as people in the West have protested against the use of the death penalty, including against minors. Protests also erupted across the Middle East in January.

Sara Hashah, Amnesty International's Middle East and North Africa spokesperson, said Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and Iran were responsible for 90 % of all recorded executions globally and were out of step with the rest of the world.

"In Saudi Arabia, where people are routinely sentenced to death after grossly unfair trials, we have seen a dramatic surge in the number of executions in the past 2 years which has shown no sign of abating in 2016," she told The Independent in July.

"This clearly demonstrates that Saudi Arabia's authorities are increasingly out of step with a global trend of states moving away from the death penalty.

"Saudi Arabia's authorities must end their reliance on this cruel, inhuman and degrading form of punishment immediately."

Mr Adam was reportedly detained in February 2012 for taking part in protests in his home town of Qatif the previous year, when he was 18 years old.

The Qatif region of Saudi Arabia is majority Shia. There are regular protests in the area against the Saudi government.

Mr Adam's family said he was a kind, simple young man who loves fishing. They said he was involved in an accident when he was six in which his skull was fractured, leaving his sight and hearing impaired. He was told by his doctor that trauma could worsen the injuries, but police allegedly ignored medical evidence and beat him anyway.

He is currently appealing his sentence.

Reprieve said: "Munir's bogus 'confession' was the sole piece of evidence presented against him at his trial. He has never been allowed to speak to a lawyer."

The organisation added that concerns for Mr Adam's fate come shortly after the re-election of Saudi Arabia to the UN Human Rights Council.

Source: Belfast Telegraph, November 4, 2016

⚑ | Report an error, an omission; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; send a submission; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Iran: Three Hand Amputations, Four Hangings Carried Out in Qom

Iran: Woman Asylum Seeker Lashed 80 Times After Being Deported From Norway

Iran: Three executions carried out, two in front of large crowds

Gambia: President Barrow Signs Abolition Of Death Penalty Treaty

Texas Child Killer John Battaglia Found Competent for Execution

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Two Myanmar migrants make final appeal in Koh Tao murder case

Kenya: Man to hang for stealing toothpaste and toothbrush

Seventeen Hanged in Various Iranian Prisons, One in Public

Judge warns death row inmate to keep Nevada's execution manual secret