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America Is Stuck With the Death Penalty for (At Least) a Generation

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With Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement, the national fight to abolish capital punishment will have to go local.
When the Supreme Court revived capital punishment in 1976, just four years after de facto abolishing it, the justices effectively took ownership of the American death penalty and all its outcomes. They have spent the decades since then setting its legal and constitutional parameters, supervising its general implementation, sanctioning its use in specific cases, and brushing aside concerns about its many flaws.
That unusual role in the American legal system is about to change. With Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement from the court this summer, the Supreme Court will lose a heterodox jurist whose willingness to cross ideological divides made him the deciding factor in many legal battles. In cases involving the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment, his judgment often meant the difference between life and death for hundreds of death-row pr…

Manny Pacquiao on death penalty: It's in the Bible

Emmanuel "Manny" Pacquiao
Emmanuel "Manny" Pacquiao
Newly-proclaimed Senator-elect Emmanuel "Manny" Pacquiao made it to his first press conference as Upper House legislator and said he is in favor of death penalty.

Speaking to the media shortly after his proclamation Thursday at the PICC, Pacquiao said that the capital punishment is actually based on the Bible.

Pacquiao also wanted to push for better education for Filipinos.

The world-renowned boxer first forayed into politics as a representative for Sarangani. His stint as a legislator was hounded by his absences. In 2014, his absences hit notorious levels after being only able to show up for work 4 times.

In his 1st term that spanned from 2010 to 2013, he only appeared in 98 times in the Congress's 168 working days.

Pacquiao's best moment as a legislator came in a speech against human trafficking. But that was swiftly negated when he was put under the spotlight during a lengthy discussion of the Reproductive Health Bill.

Earlier this year, Pacquiao's chances in the senatorial race were believed to dim after his scathing remarks that targeted the members of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered (LGBT) community - which also drew flak on social media.

But even after the comments, Pacquiao still managed to secure 16,050,546 votes, propelling him to 7th place in the "Magic 12" candidates who made the cut.

Pacquiao ranked ahead of tested politicians former Sen. Francis Pangilinan, former Rep. Risa Hontiveros and former Sen. Ralph Recto.

Asked if his absences will continue to plague his career as a politician, Pacquiao noted that he won't make any promises.

Source: Philippine Star, May 19, 2016

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