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America Is Stuck With the Death Penalty for (At Least) a Generation

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With Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement, the national fight to abolish capital punishment will have to go local.
When the Supreme Court revived capital punishment in 1976, just four years after de facto abolishing it, the justices effectively took ownership of the American death penalty and all its outcomes. They have spent the decades since then setting its legal and constitutional parameters, supervising its general implementation, sanctioning its use in specific cases, and brushing aside concerns about its many flaws.
That unusual role in the American legal system is about to change. With Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement from the court this summer, the Supreme Court will lose a heterodox jurist whose willingness to cross ideological divides made him the deciding factor in many legal battles. In cases involving the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment, his judgment often meant the difference between life and death for hundreds of death-row pr…

ISIS militants throw gay man off roof in latest video

A gay man was thrown off a building top by ISIS militants in Mosoul, Iraq in May 2015 (file photo)
A gay man was thrown off a building top by ISIS militants in Mosoul, Iraq
in May 2015 (file photo)
LONDON: A gruesome propaganda video showing ISIS terrorists throwing a man accused of being homosexual off the roof of a building has emerged on social media this week.

After the man plunges to his death, other men waiting at the bottom of the building run towards his body and pelt it with stones.

The footage titled 'The Voice of Virtue in Deterring Hell' includes a number of shocking scenes including a beheading, 'Daily Mirror' reports.

Another part of the video, released on April 6 on ISIS terrorist channels, shows a blindfolded man knelt on the floor waiting to be beheaded and another prisoner with his arm stretched out on a table as militants prepare to cut his hand off.

The video, believed to be shot in Syria, then cuts to ISIS fighters destroying and burning Christian relics and pulling a cross down off the top of a church as well as destroying bottles of alcohol.

The professionally shot, edited and produced video cuts between piles of rocks used for stoning and large crowds gathering for prayer.

The allegedly gay man is thrown from the roof of the building, before another blindfolded and kneeling man is brutally beheaded.

The video then shows the body of the man thrown to his death being stoned by a waiting crowd.

ISIS is known for its brutal treatment of homosexuals and the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights estimates that in January this year alone around 25 gay men were murdered by ISIS.

Source: PTI, April 8, 2016

Related content:

Below is a video purportedly released by the Islamic State which shows two men accused of homosexuality being thrown from a building and stoned by a crowd once they hit the ground. The video was released August 14, 2015.

In the video, a masked man reads the charges against the accused gay men before they are led up onto a rooftop and thrown off. A crowd of men wait below and once their bodies hit the ground, they stone them. Afterwards they wash both bodies and prepare them for burial.

WARNING: GRAPHIC and DISTURBING CONTENT




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