FEATURED POST

Capital Punishment in the United States Explained

Image
In our Explainer series, Fair Punishment Project lawyers help unpackage some of the most complicated issues in the criminal justice system. We break down the problems behind the headlines - like bail, civil asset forfeiture, or the Brady doctrine - so that everyone can understand them. Wherever possible, we try to utilize the stories of those affected by the criminal justice system to show how these laws and principles should work, and how they often fail. We will update our Explainers monthly to keep them current. Read our updated explainer here.
To beat the clock on the expiration of its lethal injection drug supply, this past April, Arkansas tried to execute 8 men over 1 days. The stories told in frantic legal filings and clemency petitions revealed a deeply disturbing picture. Ledell Lee may have had an intellectual disability that rendered him constitutionally ineligible for the death penalty, but he had a spate of bad lawyers who failed to timely present evidence of this claim -…

ISIS militants throw gay man off roof in latest video

A gay man was thrown off a building top by ISIS militants in Mosoul, Iraq in May 2015 (file photo)
A gay man was thrown off a building top by ISIS militants in Mosoul, Iraq
in May 2015 (file photo)
LONDON: A gruesome propaganda video showing ISIS terrorists throwing a man accused of being homosexual off the roof of a building has emerged on social media this week.

After the man plunges to his death, other men waiting at the bottom of the building run towards his body and pelt it with stones.

The footage titled 'The Voice of Virtue in Deterring Hell' includes a number of shocking scenes including a beheading, 'Daily Mirror' reports.

Another part of the video, released on April 6 on ISIS terrorist channels, shows a blindfolded man knelt on the floor waiting to be beheaded and another prisoner with his arm stretched out on a table as militants prepare to cut his hand off.

The video, believed to be shot in Syria, then cuts to ISIS fighters destroying and burning Christian relics and pulling a cross down off the top of a church as well as destroying bottles of alcohol.

The professionally shot, edited and produced video cuts between piles of rocks used for stoning and large crowds gathering for prayer.

The allegedly gay man is thrown from the roof of the building, before another blindfolded and kneeling man is brutally beheaded.

The video then shows the body of the man thrown to his death being stoned by a waiting crowd.

ISIS is known for its brutal treatment of homosexuals and the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights estimates that in January this year alone around 25 gay men were murdered by ISIS.

Source: PTI, April 8, 2016

Related content:

Below is a video purportedly released by the Islamic State which shows two men accused of homosexuality being thrown from a building and stoned by a crowd once they hit the ground. The video was released August 14, 2015.

In the video, a masked man reads the charges against the accused gay men before they are led up onto a rooftop and thrown off. A crowd of men wait below and once their bodies hit the ground, they stone them. Afterwards they wash both bodies and prepare them for burial.

WARNING: GRAPHIC and DISTURBING CONTENT




- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 30 Days)

Harris County leads Texas in life without parole sentences as death penalty recedes

Idaho County commissioners take stand against death penalty

Texas: Reginald Blanton executed

Indonesian death penalty laws to be softened to allow reformed prisoners to avoid execution

USA: Executions, Death Sentences Up Slightly in 2017

Death penalty cases of 2017 featured botched executions, claims of innocence, 'flawed' evidence

Texas executes Anthony Allen Shore

Virginia Governor commutes death sentence of killer found mentally incompetent to be executed

Texas man with scheduled execution uses letters from fellow death row inmates to argue for reprieve

New book features Kansas man who executed Nazi war criminals