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Why Texas’ ‘death penalty capital of the world’ stopped executing people

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Since the Supreme Court legalized capital punishment in 1976, Harris County, Texas, has executed 126 people. That's more executions than every individual state in the union, barring Texas itself.
Harris County's executions account for 23 percent of the 545 people Texas has executed. On the national level, the state alone is responsible for more than a third of the 1,465 people put to death in the United States since 1976.
In 2017, however, the county known as the "death penalty capital of the world" and the "buckle of the American death belt" executed and sentenced to death a remarkable number of people: zero.
This is the first time since 1985 that Harris County did not execute any of its death row inmates, and the third year in a row it did not sentence anyone to capital punishment either.
The remarkable statistic reflects a shift the nation is seeing as a whole.
“The practices that the Harris County District Attorney’s Office is following are also signifi…

Global executions reach 25-year high - Reprieve comment

The number of executions carried out globally last year rose to a 25-year high, a review of the global state of the death penalty has found.

According to new figures, 2015 saw a sharp rise in executions in Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, China and Iran, and a total of at least 1,634 people executed overall in the year. 

The report, from Amnesty International, follows the news this weekend that in Saudi Arabia, over 80 people have been executed in the country since the start of 2016 – setting the Kingdom on course to double its 2015 total this year.

The figures come ahead of a visit to Saudi Arabia by President Obama, expected to take place later this month. International human rights organization Reprieve, which assists juveniles and others facing execution the Kingdom, is urging the US government to use the trip to raise the cases of three juveniles - Ali al Nimr, Dawood al Marhoon and Abdullah al Zaher - who face execution after being arrested at protests.

Research by Reprieve late last year found that over 70% of those facing execution in Saudi Arabia were arrested for non-violent offences, including political protest, while reports of torture and forced ‘confessions’ were widespread.

The Amnesty report also follows concerns made yesterday by the UK’s Foreign Affairs Committee, over the UK government’s commitment to preventing human rights abuses abroad. In an interim report on the Foreign Office’s on the UK’s overseas human rights work, the FAC said that there was “plainly a perception” that the government had recently downgraded its commitment to the promotion of human rights.

Commenting, Maya Foa, head of the death penalty team at Reprieve, said: “The huge rise in executions in countries like Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Iran and Egypt is extremely troubling. The US and European countries must urgently speak out about these grave abuses by our allies - from mass trials and torture to death sentences handed down to political protesters and juveniles. When President Obama visits Saudi Arabia this month, he must challenge the Saudis on their appalling human rights record – and urgently press for the release of juveniles such as Ali al Nimr.”

Source: Reprieve, March 6, 2016

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