FEATURED POST

No Second Chances: What to Do After a Botched Execution

Image
Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. The state shouldn't get a second chance.
The pathos and problems of America's death penalty were vividly on display yesterday when Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. Immediately after its failure Gov. John Kasich set June 5, 2019, as a new execution date.
This plan for a second execution reveals a glaring inadequacy in the legal standards governing botched executions in the United States.
Campbell was tried and sentenced to die for murdering 18-year-old Charles Dials during a carjacking in 1997. After Campbell exhausted his legal appeals, he was denied clemency by the state parole board and the governor.
By the time the state got around to executing Campbell, he was far from the dangerous criminal of 20 years ago. As is the case with many of America's death-row inmates, the passage of time had inflicted its own punishments.
The inmate Ohio strapped onto the gurney was a 69-year-old man afflicted with serious ailm…

China's 'Valentine's Day' killer acquitted of 1998 murder

A Chinese man sentenced to death for the Valentine's Day murder of his girlfriend 18 years ago has been acquitted, a court said, the latest wrongful conviction overturned in the country.

Liu Jiqiang, 52, was found guilty of strangling and stabbing his lover on February 14, 1998, earning him the notorious nickname "Valentine's Day killer" in the Chinese press.

But after spending nearly 2 decades on death row, the Higher People's Court of Jilin province in northeast China dismissed his conviction citing insufficient evidence, the court said Friday on its official Sina Weibo microblog.

Liu initially admitted to the killing, but his lawyers said his confession was obtained as a result of torture and illegal questioning, according to Xinhua news agency.

He was handed the death penalty in December 1999 with a 2-year reprieve which in China often means life in prison.

He unsuccessfully appealed his guilty verdict twice, in 2002 and 2003, according to Xinhua.

China's courts are tightly controlled by the ruling Communist party, which has vowed to overturn mistaken verdicts in the face of widespread public anger.

Liu's case is the latest to highlight miscarriages of justice in the country, where forced confessions are widespread and more than 99 % of criminal defendants are found guilty.

In February, the high court in eastern Zheijiang ordered the release of Chen Man who had been jailed for more than two decades on murder charges.

Of those exonerated in recent years, Chen had spent the longest time in prison, 23 years, state media said.

In 2014, a court in the Inner Mongolia region cleared a man who was convicted, sentenced and executed for rape and murder in 1996 at the age of 18.

The reversal of the verdict came 9 years after another man confessed to the crime.

Source: Agence France-Presse, April 30, 2016

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

No Second Chances: What to Do After a Botched Execution

Nevada releases detailed manual on how it plans to execute death row inmate

A Travelling Executioner

Ohio: Alva Campbell execution delayed indefinitely

Iran: Prisoner Hanged in Public

Cruel and Unusual: A Second Failed Execution in Ohio

South Carolina's 1st execution in 6 years set for Dec. 1

Nevada refuses Pfizer demand to return drugs state plans to use in execution

Too Old and Too Sick to Execute? No Such Thing in Ohio.

South Carolina doesn’t have drugs for December execution