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No Second Chances: What to Do After a Botched Execution

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Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. The state shouldn't get a second chance.
The pathos and problems of America's death penalty were vividly on display yesterday when Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. Immediately after its failure Gov. John Kasich set June 5, 2019, as a new execution date.
This plan for a second execution reveals a glaring inadequacy in the legal standards governing botched executions in the United States.
Campbell was tried and sentenced to die for murdering 18-year-old Charles Dials during a carjacking in 1997. After Campbell exhausted his legal appeals, he was denied clemency by the state parole board and the governor.
By the time the state got around to executing Campbell, he was far from the dangerous criminal of 20 years ago. As is the case with many of America's death-row inmates, the passage of time had inflicted its own punishments.
The inmate Ohio strapped onto the gurney was a 69-year-old man afflicted with serious ailm…

Missouri Conservatives Urge Legislature to Repeal Death Penalty

For the first time in decades, a Missouri Senate committee is set to consider a Republican bill to repeal the death penalty in Missouri. A recently-formed group of conservative grassroots leaders applauded Sen. Paul Wieland (R - Imperial), the bill sponsor, for his fiscal responsibility and commitment to protecting innocent life from conception to natural death.

"Sen. Wieland is the true pro-life leader in the Jefferson City," said Daniel Blassi, the President of Students for Life at Southeast Missouri State University and member of Missouri Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty. "We may aim to execute only the guilty, but in practice the death penalty puts too many innocent lives at risk."

Since last year's near-execution of Kimber Edwards, a death row inmate whose sentence was commuted after the State's key witness recanted his testimony, a growing number of conservatives have begun questioning whether the government can effectively carry out capital punishment. In October, the National Association of Evangelicals approved a resolution to change its 1973 resolution which favored the death penalty. Though the NAE's new standing policy does not completely reverse their prior position, it does acknowledges the growing number of evangelicals who oppose the death penalty and increasing concerns with its application.

The conservative case is straightforward: the death penalty is at odds with the core conservative values of fiscal responsibility, limited government, and value for life. "Heinous criminals deserve swift justice, but it's difficult to justify a government program that siphons millions of dollars from Missouri taxpayers despite the lack of evidence that it deters crime," said Jake Buxton, Chair of the Truman State University College Republicans. "Our State can't afford the death penalty as it stands."

"In my mind, it is impossible to be an advocate for liberty and the death penalty at the same time," said Anthony Vibbard, President Emeritus of the University of Missouri Federalist Society. "Young conservatives across Missouri are joining together on this and I firmly believe that decades from now, our children will be appalled that we once condoned murder as punishment."

The Senate hearing will be held Tuesday, January 19, at 3 p.m. in Senate Committee Room 1 of the State Capitol.

Source: Missouri Conservatives Concerned About the Death Penalty (MADP), January 15, 2016

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