FEATURED POST

Will the Supreme Court Kill The Death Penalty This Term?

Image
Will the U.S. Supreme Court add the fate of the death penalty to a term already fraught with hot-button issues like partisan gerrymandering, warrantless surveillance, and a host of contentious First Amendment disputes?
That’s the hope of an ambitious Supreme Court petition seeking to abolish the ultimate punishment. But it runs headlong into the fact that only two justices have squarely called for a reexamination of the death penalty’s constitutionality.
Abel Hidalgo challenges Arizona’s capital punishment system—which sweeps too broadly, he says, because the state’s “aggravating factors” make 99 percent of first-degree murderers death-eligible—as well as the death penalty itself, arguing it’s cruel and unusual punishment.
He’s represented by former acting U.S. Solicitor General Neal Katyal—among the most successful Supreme Court practitioners last term. Hidalgo also has the support of several outside groups who filed amicus briefs on his behalf, notably one from a group including Ari…

California: Death penalty supporters seek to speed up executions

The Adjustment Center at San Quentin Prison, California
The Adjustment Center at San Quentin Prison, California.
Death penalty supporters got the state’s go-ahead Thursday to collect signatures for a November 2016 ballot measure aimed at speeding up executions, raising the prospect that voters will be asked to choose between toughening California’s death penalty law and repealing it.

The new initiative would require the state Supreme Court to rule on capital cases within five years. It would also limit death penalty appeals, set strict deadlines for filing appeals and seek to expand the pool of death penalty lawyers. Any attorney who now accepts court appointments to represent impoverished defendants in criminal cases would also have to take on capital cases, regardless of experience.

Another provision would eliminate the currently required public comment period before the state can approve a new single-drug execution method, which officials have proposed to replace the current three-drug executions.

Supporters of the measure say it would reduce by at least half the period, typically 25 years or more, needed to resolve death penalty appeals in California. Opponents disagree, noting that the initiative would not add funding for death penalty lawyers or court staff.

A rival initiative to repeal the death penalty and replace it with life imprisonment without parole was cleared for circulation last month. A similar repeal measure was defeated by four percentage points in November 2012.

Both initiatives need 365,880 signatures of registered voters in 180 days to qualify for the ballot. Sponsors of the new initiative have raised more than $1 million so far and expect to collect the needed signatures, said Charles Bell, a lawyer for the campaign.

California, which has nearly 750 condemned prisoners, conducted its last execution in January 2006, before a federal judge ruled that defects in lethal injection procedures and staff training created an unacceptable risk of a botched and agonizing execution.

Source: San Francisco Chronicle, Bob Egelko, December 24, 2015

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

No Second Chances: What to Do After a Botched Execution

Execution date set for Missouri inmate with rare condition

Iran: Prisoner Hanged in Public

Cruel and Unusual: A Second Failed Execution in Ohio

Record 11 Taiwanese sentenced to death in Indonesia for drug crimes

South Carolina's 1st execution in 6 years set for Dec. 1

Former Virginia death row inmate Joseph Giarratano granted parole

Will the Supreme Court Kill The Death Penalty This Term?

Nevada releases detailed manual on how it plans to execute death row inmate

Charles Manson Was Sentenced to Death. Why Wasn't He Executed?