FEATURED POST

USA | Parkland Case Challenges Us All to Figure Out What a Mass Murderer Deserves

Image
The ongoing sentencing trial of Nikolas Cruz, the 23-year-old Florida man who in 2018 murdered fourteen students and three staff members at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day, will test whether the seven men and five women on the jury hearing his case can hate the sin but muster the courage to spare the life of the sinner. That is exactly what his defense team is asking them to do as they sit in judgment of the person who perpetrated one of this country’s most brutal mass murders. Like many death penalty defense lawyers before them, Cruz’s lawyers, to their credit, have not downplayed the gravity of the horrors their client inflicted in Parkland, Florida. Instead, during the sentencing trial, or what the journalist Dahlia Lithwick once called a “trial of the heart,” they have focused their attention on who Cruz is and the factors that shaped his life. As the Supreme Court said more than fifty years ago, in capital cases those who impose the sentence must consider “

Equatorial Guinea abolishes death penalty

Equatorial Guinea, one of the world's most authoritarian countries, has abolished the death penalty, state television announced on Monday citing a new law signed by President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo.

Capital punishment was "totally abolished" in the oil-rich central African nation after the president signed a new penal code, shared on Twitter by the vice president.

The last official execution in the small country was carried out in 2014, according to Amnesty International, but international NGOs and the United Nations regularly accuse the regime of forced disappearances, arbitrary detention and torture.

The death penalty remains legal in more than 30 African countries, although only around half have executed people in recent years.

"I am writing in capitals to seal this unique moment: 'EQUATORIAL GUINEA HAS ABOLISHED THE DEATH PENALTY'," tweeted Vice President Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue, one of the head of state's sons and viewed as his likely successor.

A journalist on state television called the event "historic for our country" in a brief announcement at the end of a news programme.

The measure will come into force in the 90 days following its publication in the official state journal and was approved in advance by parliament, where all but one of the 100 MPs represent the ruling party.

President Obiang, 80, has spent more than 43 years in power, a world record when excluding monarchies.

Equatorial Guinea possesses significant oil and gas resources, but the vast majority of its 1.3 million inhabitants live below the poverty line, according to the World Bank.

📱 Follow Death Penalty News on TELEGRAM

Source: Agence France-Presse, Staff, September 20, 2022





đŸš© | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.




Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Japan | Rare recording captures final hours of a death row inmate

Alabama halts execution at last minute on Thursday after determining it could not be completed by a midnight deadline, officials say

With little oversight in Texas, autopsies often careless

Alabama | Judge tells state to ‘locate and preserve evidence’ in failed execution of Alan Eugene Miller

USA | Execution by Nitrogen Hypoxia Touted as More ‘Humane,’ but Evidence Is Lacking

Texas Prosecutor Loses Attempt to Spare a Murderer From Execution

USA | Parkland Case Challenges Us All to Figure Out What a Mass Murderer Deserves

China | Man Who Arranged Girlfriend's Murder Sentenced to Death, Former Justice Minister Given Suspended Death Sentence

Texas executes Rickey Lynn Lewis

Singapore | Why a person may not get a death sentence even if convicted of murder