FEATURED POST

USA | States Continue to Oppose DNA Testing in Death Penalty Appeals, Attorneys Ask Why Don’t They Want to Learn the Truth?

Image
The last 3 men scheduled for execution in Georgia said they did not commit the killing and that DNA testing that was not available at the time of trial could prove it. In 2 of the cases, victim family members supported the request for testing. Prosecutors opposed the requests, and the courts refused to allow the testing. 2 of the 3 men were executed, with doubts still swirling as to their guilt.
Shawn Nolan, a federal defender who represented Georgia prisoner Ray “Jeff” Cromartie, summed up the sentiments of the prisoners, families, and defense attorneys in these cases. “I’d like to know what the state is so scared of,” he said. “Why are they afraid of the truth? This is sad and so disturbing.”
“We have the capability of testing a wide range of forensic evidence that we couldn’t test in the past,” said Death Penalty Information Center Executive Director Robert Dunham. “It is a powerful tool to get to the truth and to get important answers as to whether the criminal legal system has b…

49% of Russians Want Death Penalty Back, Down from 68% in 2002

Russian prisoner in jail
An increase from 44% in 2017, but a decrease from 68% in 2002

The number of Russians who support the death penalty’s return has climbed to almost 50%, according to the independent Levada Center pollster’s survey released Thursday.

While the death penalty remains enshrined in Russian law, the Kremlin placed a moratorium on its use in 1996 as a condition of Council of Europe membership. 

Debates on restoring the death penalty have resurfaced following last month’s murder of a schoolgirl in southern Russia.


Forty-nine percent of Russian respondents would like to see the return of the death penalty, according to Levada’s results, an increase from 44% in 2017. 

In 2002, when the pollster first asked the question, 68% of Russian respondents had said they would like to re-establish capital punishment. 

“When I discuss this in focus groups, people kept saying that we can be wrongly convicted and that’s why it’s dangerous to return [capital] punishment,” Levada sociologist Denis Volkov told the RBC news website of capital punishment’s decline in popularity since the early 2000s.

Among the death penalty’s supporters in 2019, 33% said they would like to see Russia implement capital punishment the way it had been used in the 1990s. 

The other 16% favored expanding the death penalty.

According to Levada, 21% of respondents said the moratorium should remain in place, while 19% said the death penalty should be abolished.

Russians aged over 55 were the most avid supporters of capital punishment at 55%. 

Support declined proportionately among younger age groups. 

Levada conducted the survey among 1,616 respondents across 50 Russian regions on Oct. 24-30.

Source: themoscowtimes.com, Staff, November 7, 2019


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Alabama | Nathaniel Woods to be executed on March 5

Ohio executes Reginald Brooks

Philippines: A moral, ethical issue for our people

Texas executes Dale Devon Scheanette

Somalia | Puntland executes child rapists

Oklahoma to resume lethal injection executions

"Cruel, inhuman, and degrading": the death penalty in Luxembourg

Switzerland bans death penalty but will now help prisoners commit assisted suicide

India | SC decides to fast-track hearing of criminal appeals in death penalty cases

Nirbhaya case: Supreme Court issues notices to 4 death row convicts on Centre's appeal against Delhi HC verdict