FEATURED POST

In the crosshairs of conscience: John Kitzhaber's death penalty reckoning

Image
To cope with his dread, John Kitzhaber opened his leather-bound journal and began to write.
It was a little past 9 on the morning of Nov. 22, 2011. Gary Haugen had dropped his appeals. A Marion County judge had signed the murderer's death warrant, leaving Kitzhaber, a former emergency room doctor, to decide Haugen's fate. The 49-year-old would soon die by lethal injection if the governor didn't intervene.
Kitzhaber was exhausted, having been unable to sleep the night before, but he needed to call the families of Haugen's victims.
"I know my decision will delay the closure they need and deserve," he wrote.
The son of University of Oregon English professors, Kitzhaber began writing each day in his journal in the early 1970s. The practice helped him organize his thoughts and, on that particular morning, gather his courage.
Kitzhaber first dialed the widow of David Polin, an inmate Haugen beat and stabbed to death in 2003 while already serving a life sentence fo…

6 North Koreans executed by firing squad after trying to smuggle out nation's phonebook

Kim Jong Un
6 North Koreans were executed by firing squad after trying to smuggle out the nation's phonebook, it has emerged.

The residents from the capital Pyongyang were executed at the end of last year on the charge of treason for attempting to leak the contents of a directory to the outside world.

Their relatives were booted out of the city and exiled in the countryside. North Korea's phonebook is considered a secret document.

It contains the phone numbers of factories and companies, managers, party chairmen and other high-ranking officials and office numbers and can sell for up to around 5,700 pounds in China.

'The authorities relayed the message to legal organisations through lecture materials stating that, 'At the end of last year, 6 Pyongyang residents who attempted to distribute a phonebook outside of the country were executed.'

'The point was emphasised that those who commit such acts can be punished at any moment,' a high-ranking source in the capital told Daily NK during a telephone call.

'The lecture materials explained: "A phonebook can be sold for 50,000 yuan in Chinese money. These individuals chose to commit treason in order to avoid working hard to earn money".'

The seriousness with which the punishment was enforced is thought to be related to the fact that the crime was committed in Pyongyang, the 'Revolutionary Capital' where the country's most loyal subjects supposedly reside.

'The families of the 6 executed individuals were deported to the Hwanghae Province area,' a separate source in Pyongyang said.

'The leadership of the country's party, military, and political leadership is all concentrated in the city of Pyongyang.

Many cadres who go in and out of the country also reside in Pyongyang.

That explains why the authorities reacted so strongly in order to prevent information about them from leaking out of the country.'

Source: dailymail.co.uk, Matt Acton, April 25, 2018


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

New Hampshire: More than 50,000 anti-death penalty signatures delivered to Sununu

Texas: The accused Santa Fe shooter will never get the death penalty. Here’s why.

Texas executes Juan Castillo

Mary Jane Veloso: The woman the firing squad left behind

Five executed in Iran, two hanged in public

The secret executions in Europe's 'last dictatorship'

In the crosshairs of conscience: John Kitzhaber's death penalty reckoning

Collection of items from the career of Britain's most famous executioner discovered

What Indiana officials want to keep secret about executions

China: Appeal of nanny's death penalty sentence wraps up