Iran: Annual report on the death penalty 2017

IRAN HUMAN RIGHTS (MARCH 13, 2018): The 10th annual report on the death penalty in Iran by Iran Human Rights (IHR) and ECPM shows that in 2017 at least 517 people were executed in the Islamic Republic of Iran. 
This number is comparable with the execution figures in 2016 and confirms the relative reduction in the use of the death penalty compared to the period between 2010 and 2015. 
Nevertheless, with an average of more than one execution every day and more than one execution per one million inhabitants in 2017, Iran remained the country with the highest number of executions per capita.
2017 Annual Report at a Glance:
At least 517 people were executed in 2017, an average of more than one execution per day111 executions (21%) were announced by official sources.Approximately 79% of all executions included in the 2017 report, i.e. 406 executions, were not announced by the authorities.At least 240 people (46% of all executions) were executed for murder charges - 98 more than in 2016.At le…

Maldives Could Resume Executions within Hours after 60-year Moratorium

Maldives flag
The Maldivian government could resume executions within hours after a moratorium that has lasted 60 years, Reprieve understands.

Reports suggest that President Abdullah Yameen is preparing to go through with his repeated threat of starting to carry out death sentences before the end of July. 

There are currently three men who have had their death sentences confirmed by the Supreme Court who could be executed immediately. 

Local media have quoted the Home Affair Minister, Azleen Ahmed saying the government have expedited efforts to implement the death penalty in recent days.

The de facto moratorium on the death penalty has been in place in the Maldives for more than 60 years. 

In June 2013 the Parliament rejected a new death penalty law but in one of his first acts after coming to power, President Yameen enacted a regulation reintroducing the death penalty, bypassing Parliament.

Forced confessions, politically-motivated charges, and other abuses are commonplace. Children and those suffering from mental illness have been sentenced to death, in violation of international law.

Commenting, Director of Reprieve, Maya Foa said: “This is a worrying move from a President who is trying to distract from instability in the country and opposition to his leadership. Evidence shows that the death penalty does nothing to reduce violent crime – especially when it is imposed for political convenience and with no due process. This is a naked attempt by President Yameen to suppress dissent and tighten his grip on power. He should listen to the international community, keep the moratorium on executions and start the democratic reforms that are needed to bring stability back to the islands.”

➤ Click HERE to call on President Yameen of the Maldives to not break the six decade moratorium on the death penalty by resuming executions (Reprieve online petition).

Source: Reprieve, July 19, 2017

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