FEATURED POST

In the crosshairs of conscience: John Kitzhaber's death penalty reckoning

Image
To cope with his dread, John Kitzhaber opened his leather-bound journal and began to write.
It was a little past 9 on the morning of Nov. 22, 2011. Gary Haugen had dropped his appeals. A Marion County judge had signed the murderer's death warrant, leaving Kitzhaber, a former emergency room doctor, to decide Haugen's fate. The 49-year-old would soon die by lethal injection if the governor didn't intervene.
Kitzhaber was exhausted, having been unable to sleep the night before, but he needed to call the families of Haugen's victims.
"I know my decision will delay the closure they need and deserve," he wrote.
The son of University of Oregon English professors, Kitzhaber began writing each day in his journal in the early 1970s. The practice helped him organize his thoughts and, on that particular morning, gather his courage.
Kitzhaber first dialed the widow of David Polin, an inmate Haugen beat and stabbed to death in 2003 while already serving a life sentence fo…

UAE: Father of Pakistani victim pardons Indian youth convicted for murder

Abu Dhabi Court of Appeals
Abu Dhabi Court of Appeals
Abu Dhabi: Ten young Indians in Al Ain jail can hope to escape a death sentence as the family of a Pakistani man, who was allegedly murdered by them, has agreed to pardon the convicts.

The father of Mohammad Farhan [the victim] appeared in the Al Ain appeals court on Wednesday and submitted a letter of consent to pardon the accused Indians, a senior Indian Embassy official told Gulf News on Sunday.

On behalf of the accused, an Indian charity organisation deposited the blood money in the court and the case has been adjourned for further hearing on April 12, said Dinesh Kumar, Counsellor, Community Affairs at the Indian Embassy in Abu Dhabi.

“It is expected that the court may commute the death sentence,” he said.

As Gulf News reported on December 8, 2016, the murder allegedly occurred during a brawl over bootlegging in Al Ain in December 2015. 

Eleven men from the Indian state of Punjab were convicted in the case but one was spared the death sentence.

S.P.S Oberoi, Chairman of Sarbat Da Bhala Charitable Trust that donated blood money for the accused men, told Gulf News that it was a tough task to obtain pardon from the Pakistani family. “For me, it is easy to give money, but tough to convince the victim’s family to pardon the accused,” said Oberoi, a Dubai-based businessman.

He said his Pakistani manager travelled to Peshawar and talked to the family and their relatives to secure the pardon. The father of the victim finally said he did not want ten other Indian families to face the same tragic fate. “He [father] told me, there was no solution to his family’s pain. Why does he want to inflict the same pain to ten Indian families [if their sons face death punishment],” Oberoi said.

All the convicted young Indian men are from poor families and worked in Al Ain as plumbers, electricians, carpenters and masons. Most of them in their twenties had paid huge sums to recruitment agents in India to secure a visa to reach the UAE.

Source: Gulf News, March 26, 2017

⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

New Hampshire: More than 50,000 anti-death penalty signatures delivered to Sununu

Texas: The accused Santa Fe shooter will never get the death penalty. Here’s why.

Texas executes Juan Castillo

Mary Jane Veloso: The woman the firing squad left behind

Five executed in Iran, two hanged in public

What Indiana officials want to keep secret about executions

Post Mortem – the execution of Edward Earl Johnson

Collection of items from the career of Britain's most famous executioner discovered

In the crosshairs of conscience: John Kitzhaber's death penalty reckoning

China: Appeal of nanny's death penalty sentence wraps up