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The Aum Shinrikyo Executions: Why Now?

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With the execution of Aum Shinrikyo leader and six of his followers, Japan looks to leave behind an era of tragedy. 
On July 6, 2018, Japanese authorities executed seven members of the religious movement Aum Shinrikyo (Aum true religion, or supreme truth), which carried out the 1995 Tokyo subway sarin attack and a series of other atrocities. None of the seven of the executed men were directly involved in releasing the gas on that tragic day; four of those who did remain under a death sentence, and their executions may be imminent.
The seven executed were involved in planning and organizing the various crimes committed by Aum. Asahara Shoko (born Matsumoto Chizuo), was the founder and leader of the movement, having developed the doctrinal system instrumental to Aum’s violence and its concept of a final cosmic war of good (Aum) against evil (the corrupt material world and everyone — from the Japanese government to the general public — who lived in it). Asahara is believed to have given …

Iran's Chief Justice orders expeditious implementation of the death decrees

 Sadeq Larijani
Sadeq Larijani
Fearing a popular uprising, the regime leaders step up social clampdown, executions

Mullah Sadeq Larijani, the criminal Chief Justice of the Iranian regime, emphasized that it is not the Judiciary's policy to eliminate executions for drug smugglers.

He said, "When did we have such an inclination? ... This claim that executions were not useful is irrelevant. I urge all prosecutors across the country not to delay the implementation of the verdicts, and carry them out once they are issued. We are not allowed to delay carrying out the verdicts for 3 years and let the criminals begin praying in prison and then argue that since they pray we should cancel their executions. We cannot do away with executions in general because it undermines the judiciary's deterrence."

The regime's chief justice admitted that executions are a means for establishing security in society. Larijani stressed, "One of the reasons for the effectiveness of these punishments is their prompt, expeditious and decisive implementation. It is against the interests of society and the Judiciary to prolong the prosecution process." He criticized "giving opportunity during the prosecution" to those accused of drug smuggling and said, "The prosecutor offices must establish security on all levels and take this task seriously."

The cruel remarks by the Iranian regime's Chief Justice on the need to continue implementation and expedition of the death penalty come while there have 29 executions in the past 3 days, alone, and the average number of executions per day has amounted to 10.

The notion of moderation is a mirage in the medieval clerical regime ruling Iran. Stepping up repression, torture and executions has been the barbaric regime's only way to confront the rising tide of popular discontent, amidst massive domestic and international crises, and to prevent another popular uprising which would uproot the regime.

Source: NCRI, September 30, 2016

Executions against drug traffickers will remain in place: Iran


Iran: Barbaric and medieval punishments
Iran: Barbaric and medieval punishments
Iran's Judiciary Chief Sadeq Amoli Larijani said on Thursday that it is not the Judiciary's policy to cancel executions for drug traffickers, Mehr reported.

"The claim that executions have not been useful is irrelevant," said Larijani during a judicial conference in Mashhad.

The senior judge said drug traffickers have inflicted a great deal of harm on the country, noting that an immediate action is needed in response to such crimes.

The judiciary chief further urged all prosecutors across the country not to "delay the implementation of verdicts, and carry them out immediately after they are issued."

He went on to say that the prosecutors are not allowed to delay the verdicts for 3 years.

"We cannot do away with executions in general because it undermines the judiciary's deterrent effect," Larijani remarked.

He also urged the prosecutors to "impose other forms of punishments, if possible, instead of death penalty".

Iran has been under pressure by the UN Human Rights Council for its use of death penalty against drug traffickers.

However, Iranian officials denounce such pressures as interference in the country's domestic affairs and call on the UN officials to "refrain from politicizing the issue of human rights" in the Islamic Republic.

The Iranian High Council for Human Rights has responded to criticisms against the country's Judiciary, saying that the structure of Iran's judicial system guarantees the process of a fair trial.

Source: Tehran Times, September 30, 2016

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