FEATURED POST

America Is Stuck With the Death Penalty for (At Least) a Generation

Image
With Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement, the national fight to abolish capital punishment will have to go local.
When the Supreme Court revived capital punishment in 1976, just four years after de facto abolishing it, the justices effectively took ownership of the American death penalty and all its outcomes. They have spent the decades since then setting its legal and constitutional parameters, supervising its general implementation, sanctioning its use in specific cases, and brushing aside concerns about its many flaws.
That unusual role in the American legal system is about to change. With Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement from the court this summer, the Supreme Court will lose a heterodox jurist whose willingness to cross ideological divides made him the deciding factor in many legal battles. In cases involving the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment, his judgment often meant the difference between life and death for hundreds of death-row pr…

Saudi Arabia Urges Need For Death Penalty After Sharp Rise In ‘Homosexual’ Arrests

Citing a threat to the “social fabric” of the nation, the Saudi Arabian judiciary is proposing the death penalty for men found guilty of engaging in or soliciting homosexual activity as well as “men’s attempts to look like women.”

Describing them as “perverts,” officials have noted the deleterious effects social media are having on their citizenry. They note the recent appearance of the hashtag #I_am_gay_will_not_be_deterred as proof of the potential upheaval this devout Muslim nation could face if stronger measures are not adopted.

“Some defended an individual’s freedom to express his sexuality, while most users said that homosexuality is a transgression and a capital offense. “It has nothing to do with freedom, it’s breaching the laws of Allah,” wrote one commenter on Twitter. “When a man has sex with another man, God is trembling.”

A recent spate of news has emerged indicating the seriousness nature of the punishment people face when accused of anything remotely ‘gay.’ As we reported here Monday, a doctor was arrested after hanging a rainbow flag outside his home. (He was released on his own recognizance, stating he did not know of the flag’s symbolism and only hung it because his child found the colors ‘pretty.’)

At the same time, Okaz, a Saudi Arabian daily based out of Jeddah, reports that a man in his 50s was arrested for making online sexual advances to men. While being questioned, he begged police to forgive him and said he wouldn’t do it again.

Combating homosexuality remains one of the major goals of the Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice (CPVPV), along with its campaign against consumption of alcohol and the practice of magic. 

Source: The Gaily Grind, Victor Hoff, March 30, 2016

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Texas: With a man's execution days away, his victims react with fury or forgiveness

Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles rejects clemency for Chris Young

Texas executes Christopher Young

Ohio executes Robert Van Hook

The Aum Shinrikyo Executions: Why Now?

Execution date pushed back for Texas 7 escapee after paperwork error on death warrant

Indonesia: Gay couple publicly whipped after vigilante mob drags them out of beauty salon

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

Fentanyl And The Death Penalty

Saudi Arabia executes seven people in one day