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A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof

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“What are you?” a member of the Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston asked at the trial of the white man who killed eight of her fellow black parishioners and their pastor. “What kind of subhuman miscreant could commit such evil?... What happened to you, Dylann?”
Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah spent months in South Carolina searching for an answer to those questions—speaking with Roof’s mother, father, friends, former teachers, and victims’ family members, all in an effort to unlock what went into creating one of the coldest killers of our time.
Sitting beside the church, drinking from a bottle of Smirnoff Ice, he thought he had to go in and shoot them.
They were a small prayer group—a rising-star preacher, an elderly minister, eight women, one young man, and a little girl. But to him, they were a problem. He believed that, as black Americans, they were raping “our women and are taking over our country.” So he took out his Glock handgun and calmly, while their eyes were closed in prayer, ope…

Bali Nine: Artist Ben Quilty welcomes Myuran Sukumaran's paintings to Australia

"Myu's paintings safely and finally back in Australia."
"Myu's paintings safely and finally back in Australia."
The final paintings by Bali Nine ringleader Myuran Sukumaran have arrived back in Australia, almost a year after his execution in Indonesia.

The delivery of the death row artworks was announced on social media on Friday afternoon by Sukumaran's mentor and friend, Sydney artist Ben Quilty.

The Archibald winner posted a photo of wooden boxes and wrapped canvases to Facebook and Twitter with the caption: "Myu's paintings safely and finally back in Australia."

It comes more than 10 months after Sukumaran and fellow convicted Bali Nine drug smuggler, Andrew Chan, were executed by firing squad on Indonesia's Nusakambangan island on April 29 last year.

The western Sydney pair were arrested in 2005 for attempting to smuggle heroin out of Bali and spent the next decade in Kerobokan Prison.

They were dubbed the "godfather" and the "enforcer" of the nine-person drug syndicate.

"Self portrait after our new arrivals, A bad sleep last night", by Myuran Sukumaran, April 25, 2015
"Self portrait after our new arrivals, A bad sleep
last night", by Myuran Sukumaran, 05/25/2015
One of Sukumaran's lawyers reached out to Quilty in 2012 after his imprisoned client expressed a desire to learn how to paint.

With the artist's guidance, Sukumaran began teaching classes to rehabilitate other inmates.

He was awarded an associate degree in fine arts from Curtin University just months before his death.

Some of his most haunting works are believed to be among the cargo, including one of the Indonesian flag dripping with blood and a self-portrait with a gaping hole in his chest where his heart should be.

The oil painting was transported off the island, still wet, by his lawyer Julian McMahon during a three-hour visit at Besi Prison just days before Sukumaran's death.

A month earlier, Sukumaran revealed a painting of Indonesian President Joko Widodo with the inscription "people can change" after his final plea for clemency was denied.

The 34-year-old's paintings became noticeably darker as his execution date drew near.

It is not yet known whether they will be exhibited.

Source: ABC.net.au, AAP, March 11, 2016


Artist Ben Quilty faces his reflection for Self Portrait on Paper exhibition

Ben Quilty
Ben Quilty
ARCHIBALD Prize-winning artist Ben Quilty has created a piece for the Bouddi Foundation’s Self Portrait on Paper exhibition, which asked 24 of Australia’s most highly regarded artists to distil themselves on to a single sheet of white paper.

What he discovered? If you truly turn the mirror on yourself, then you are forced to face the reflection.

Quilty’s piece, titled simply Self Portrait 2016, shows the “madness, reflects a sort of intensity” spilling over from the hectic start to his year — travelling to refugee camps with World Vision, an experience he said was incredibly moving.

Though, he said, “last year was worse”.

Quilty’s friendship and mentor relationship with Bali Nine member Myuran Sukumaran lasted for three years until the convicted drug smuggler was executed in April last year.

Over those years, Quilty saw Sukumaran confront his own self-portraits and harness the power of looking inward.

“Young people, and Myuran in the most extreme sense, have a very meaningful experience of the world right in front of them,” he said.

“He had a bigger life experience than anyone I ever met.

“I quite often find people are afraid to look, but the most interesting things happen at home, the things that make what it is to be a human in 2016 as opposed to any other time in history.”

Click here to read the full article (+ paintings)

Source: dailytelegraph.com.au, March 11, 2016

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