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America Is Stuck With the Death Penalty for (At Least) a Generation

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With Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement, the national fight to abolish capital punishment will have to go local.
When the Supreme Court revived capital punishment in 1976, just four years after de facto abolishing it, the justices effectively took ownership of the American death penalty and all its outcomes. They have spent the decades since then setting its legal and constitutional parameters, supervising its general implementation, sanctioning its use in specific cases, and brushing aside concerns about its many flaws.
That unusual role in the American legal system is about to change. With Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement from the court this summer, the Supreme Court will lose a heterodox jurist whose willingness to cross ideological divides made him the deciding factor in many legal battles. In cases involving the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment, his judgment often meant the difference between life and death for hundreds of death-row pr…

Political prisoner hanged on verge of Rouhani's visit to Europe

President Hassan Rouhani: The Smiling Face of the Mullahs
President Hassan Rouhani: The Smiling Face of the Mullahs
The Iranian Resistance calls on the international community and human rights defenders to condemn the criminal execution of dervish, political prisoner Fardin Hosseini. 

His secret execution in Kermanshah's prison on January 21 as Rouhani, the demagogue president of the Iranian regime, was about to travel to Italy, Vatican and France makes Rouhani's visit all the more illegitimate and makes holding Rouhani accountable for the severe violation of human rights twofold necessary. 

The execution of over 2200 prisoners, including followers of various religions and faiths, is part of the infamous dossier of Rouhani's 2 1/2 years presidency. Rouhani, along with other leaders of this regime, should face justice for all their crimes, particularly for crime against humanity for the execution of 120,000 political prisoners.

Mr. Fardin Hosseini was constantly under torture and interrogations in intelligence ministry cells and medieval prisons in Qom, Dieselabad of Kermanshah, and Gohardasht (Rajai Shahr). The henchmen also arrested his family and harassed them to extract forced confession from him.

He wrote In a letter to Amnesty International and the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Iran in June 2015: I was numerously pressured by my torturers that if I accept the charges brought against me during my interrogation and if I confess and accept the fictitious charges in the courts, they would pay a large sum of money to me and my children and they can relocate me to any place in the world that I want and that I will be protected ... all this calamity was solely for my beliefs.

Time and again he asked for an open court with the participation of the media, but the Iranian regime never accepted his request.

Iranian regime's judiciary had accused Mr. Fardin Hosseini of killing Mullah Sabaei, the former Friday prayer imam of Savejbolaq, in mid June 2007 but he repeatedly denied the allegations. Sabaei working under Mullah Mohammadi Gilani's supervision was involved in issuing death verdicts and massacring prisoners in executions of political prisoners in 1981.


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