FEATURED POST

The Leader of Europe's 'Last Dictatorship' Is Facing an Unprecedented Challenge. Here's What It Could Mean for Belarus

Image
Europe’s longest serving leader Alexander Lukashenko has long worked hard to seem invincible. He has dominated past elections that the U.S. has deemed neither free nor fair and brokered no dissent and suppressed protests. Now, he is facing an unprecedented challenge as he runs for a sixth term as president of Belarus in elections on August 9. A former teacher and political novice, Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, has emerged as his main rival, pledging to topple Lukashenko’s regime and restore democracy.
Tens of thousands have rallied across Belarus in some of the country’s biggest opposition protests in a decade, amid mounting frustration over the government’s mishandling of the COVID-19 crisis, combined with grievances about the economy. Referring to Lukashenko, protestors chanted ‘stop the cockroach’ and held placards reading ‘change!’.
“For the first time in his 26-year rule, Lukashenko knows the majority don’t support him,” says Aleksandr Feduta, a former aide to the incumbent, who was i…

North Korea: Prospects of a Purge

(...) While Kim Il-sung was revered by his people for fighting Japanese colonial rule, the halo surrounding his successors has steadily dimmed to such an extent that his grandson, the new ruler, will have to rely on people such as his uncle, Jang, to hold on to power, at least in the short term.

Official media in the North have built Kim Jong-un, a jowly and rotund man in his late 20s, into a leader worthy of inheriting the crown, naming him "respected general," "great successor," "outstanding leader" and "supreme commander."

This year, dissident groups based in South Korea, citing North Korean refugees and businessmen working in China, linked the youngest Kim to a crackdown on business activities and a tougher policy on people seeking to flee from North Korea.

Those reports could not be verified independently, but would again suggest that further repression is more likely than an economic opening under the new man.

It also gives little hope for the 200,000 North Koreans who human rights group Amnesty international says are enslaved in labor camps, subjected to torture and hunger or execution.

"There is likely to be a politically motivated purge and imprisonment, and it could go on for a considerable period of time," said Pak Sang-hak, who heads a group in Seoul working to support defectors, and is himself a defector.

"That is especially because of the relative instability of Kim Jong-un's leadership. There might also be persecution as a way of intimidation and discipline."


Source: Reuters, December 28, 2011

Related articles:
Dec 21, 2011
He was responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands, and perhaps millions, of North Koreans through widespread preventable starvation, horrendous prisons and forced labor camps, and public executions. Kim family ...
Dec 22, 2011
China 1000s+ Iran 388+ Iraq 120+ Saudi Arabia 69+ USA 52 Yemen 30+ Sudan 9+ Viet Nam 9+ Syria 8+ North Korea + Japan 7 Egypt 5+ Libya 4+ Bangladesh 3 Thailand 2 Botswana 1 Singapore 1 Malaysia + ...
May 14, 2011
China 1000s+ Iran 388+ Iraq 120+ Saudi Arabia 69+ USA 52 Yemen 30+ Sudan 9+ Viet Nam 9+ Syria 8+ North Korea + Japan 7 Egypt 5+ Libya 4+ Bangladesh 3 Thailand 2 Botswana 1 Singapore 1 Malaysia +. EXECUTIONS IN 2009 ...

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Saudi Arabia | Execution caught on video

Texas executes Dale Devon Scheanette

Ohio executes Reginald Brooks

Iran | Female Prisoner executed in Mashhad

California executions on hold, but coronavirus killing San Quentin inmates

Vietnam | Singaporean drug trafficker gets death sentence

USA | Angela McAnulty, Only Woman on Oregon’s Death Row, Resentenced to Life in Prison

Iran | Young woman, 32, hanged in Mashhad after 6 years on death row

The Leader of Europe's 'Last Dictatorship' Is Facing an Unprecedented Challenge. Here's What It Could Mean for Belarus

USA | Execution set for sole Native American on federal death row