FEATURED POST

In the Bible Belt, Christmas Isn’t Coming to Death Row

Image
When it comes to the death penalty, guilt or innocence shouldn’t really matter to Christians.  

NASHVILLE — Until August, Tennessee had not put a prisoner to death in nearly a decade. Last Thursday, it performed its third execution in four months.
This was not a surprising turn of events. In each case, recourse to the courts had been exhausted. In each case Gov. Bill Haslam, a Republican, declined to intervene, though there were many reasons to justify intervening. Billy Ray Irick suffered from psychotic breaks that raised profound doubts about his ability to distinguish right from wrong. Edmund Zagorksi’s behavior in prison was so exemplary that even the warden pleaded for his life. David Earl Miller also suffered from mental illness and was a survivor of child abuse so horrific that he tried to kill himself when he was 6 years old.
Questions about the humanity of Tennessee’s lethal-injection protocol were so pervasive following the execution of Mr. Irick that both Mr. Zagorski and M…

US: Ginsburg suggests she has at least five more years on the Supreme Court

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
New York (CNN) -- Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said she hopes to stay on the Supreme Court until the age of 90.

"I'm now 85," Ginsburg said on Sunday. "My senior colleague, Justice John Paul Stevens, he stepped down when he was 90, so think I have about at least five more years."

She has already hired law clerks for at least two more terms.

Ginsburg spoke in New York following a production of "The Originalist," a play about the late Justice Antonin Scalia, at the 59E59 Theater.

"If I had my choice of dissenters when I was writing for the court, it would be Justice Scalia," Ginsburg said, saying that the back and forth would help her form her arguments. "Sometimes it was like a ping-pong game."

As a result, Ginsburg said, her landmark decision opening up the Virginia Military Institute to female cadets was her 18th draft.

Asked by "The Originalist" Director Molly Smith what keeps her "hopeful," Ginsburg cited her late husband, Marty.

"My dear spouse would say that the true symbol of the United States is not the bald eagle -- it is the pendulum," Ginsburg said. "And when it goes very far in one direction you can count on its swinging back."

As for retiring or term limits, Ginsburg said no chance.

"You can't set term limits, because to do that you'd have to amend the Constitution," Ginsburg said. "Article 3 says ... we hold our offices during good behavior."

"And most judges are very well behaved," she added, to laughter.

Source: CNN, Dan Berman, July 29, 2018


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Florida executes Jose Jimenez

Iran: Billionaire To Be Hanged After Government Collects His Money

Prisoner executions in Belarus ‘simply unacceptable’, says UN rights body

Opinion: Jerry Brown Has the Power to Save 740 Lives. He Should Use It.

The Electric Chair Is Back and the Death Penalty Is on Life Support

As next execution looms, Florida debates the drugs it uses to kill

Lukashenko: Decision on capital punishment should be made by people

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

Iran: Prisoner hanged in Mashhad

The slow death of the death penalty in the U.S.