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Anthony Ray Hinton Spent Almost 30 Years on Death Row. Now He Has a Message for White America.

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Anthony Ray Hinton was mowing the lawn at his mother's house in 1985 when Alabama police came to arrest him for 2 murders he did not commit. One took place when he was working the night shift at a Birmingham warehouse. Yet the state won a death sentence, based on 2 bullets it falsely claimed matched a gun found at his mother's home. In his powerful new memoir, "The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row," Hinton describes how racism and a system stacked against the poor were the driving forces behind his conviction. He also writes about the unique and unexpected bonds that can form on death row, and in particular about his relationship with Henry Hays, a former Klansman sentenced to death for a notorious lynching in 1981. Hays died in the electric chair in 1997 - 1 of 54 people executed in Alabama while Hinton was on death row.
After almost 30 years, Hinton was finally exonerated in 2015, thanks to the Equal Justice Initiative, or EJI. On April 27…

Dozens of foreign ISIS brides sentenced to death in Iraq

ISIS brides
Dozens of foreign ISIS brides are being sentenced to death in Iraq as the country exacts its revenge after 3 years of jihadi occupation.

Pleading that they themselves are victims, the women were given 10 minutes to beg for their lives before judges decide their sentence.

Many of them find little sympathy with the Iraqi judiciary and locals and are despised for their support of their militant husbands, who tore the country apart between 2014 and 2017.

French citizen Djamila Boutoutao, 29, appeared in court last month and claimed: "I thought I had married a rapper. It was only when we arrived in Turkey for a week-long "holiday" that I discovered my husband was a jihadist."

"I'm a victim. My husband beat me and locked me up in a cave with my children when I refused to follow him (to Iraq)."

She reappeared in court again last week alongside 14 other women, The Guardian reported, where she begged to keep her daughter.

She is among an estimated 1,900 French citizens and 40,000 foreigners who traveled to join ISIS's so-called caliphate in Iraq and Syria.

She said: "I'm going mad here. I'm facing a death sentence or life in prison. No one tells me anything, not the ambassador, not people in prison."

"Don't let them take my daughter away. I am willing to offer money if you can contact my parents. Please get me out of here."

According to the paper, at least 40 women have been sentenced to death, while it's believed around 300 people in total with links to ISIS have so far been executed.

Now more than 1,000 people have been placed in Baghdad jails after being identified as either members of the group or relatives of fighters.

Most of the women are widowed and many are the only caregiver left for the small children born to terrorist dads.

Last month, a court in Baghdad handed 19 Russian women life sentences for "joining and supporting" the terror group.

Al Jazeera reported many of them claimed they were misled into making the trip to Iraq.

One said: "I did not know we were in Iraq. I went with my husband and my children to Turkey to live there and then I suddenly discovered I was actually in Iraq."

The broadcaster reports that more than 20,000 have been detained on suspicion of ties to the group.

Source: New York Post, Corey Charlton, May 22, 2018


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