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Did Texas execute an innocent man? Film revisits a haunting question.

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Texans will have an opportunity to revisit a question that should haunt anyone who believes in the integrity of our criminal justice system: Did our state execute an innocent man? 
The new film “Trial by Fire” tells the true story of Cameron Todd Willingham, who was sentenced to death for setting a fire to his home in Corsicana that killed his three young daughters in 1991. The film is based on an investigative story by David Grann that appeared in the New Yorker in 2009, five years after Willingham was executed over his vociferous protestations of innocence.
In my experience of serving 8 years on the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals and 4 years as a state district judge in Travis County, the Willingham case stands out to me for many of the same reasons it stood out to filmmaker Edward Zwick, who calls it a veritable catalogue of everything that’s wrong with the criminal justice system and, especially, the death penalty. False testimony, junk science, a jailhouse informant, and ineffe…

Idaho GOP candidate Bob Nonini supports death penalty to stop abortions

Bob Nonini
A Republican lieutenant governor candidate says women who get an abortion should be punished if it is ever criminalized in Idaho, adding the punishment should include the death penalty.

Bob Nonini's comment came during a Monday candidate forum in Moscow hosted by the conservative Christian podcast CrossPolitic.

"There should be no abortion and anyone who has an abortion should pay," Nonini said.

Pressed by moderators on the nature of the punishment, Nonini nodded in agreement when asked if he supported the death penalty as a possible outcome for abortion.

Nonini, a 3 term state senator from Coeur d'Alene, confirmed that position in a phone interview with The Associated Press.

"I don't believe in any exceptions. There is always another option," Nonini said Tuesday. "Women should be charged...I firmly believe if the penalties were tougher, there would be fewer abortions."

Nonini added that his wife, Cathyanne, does not share his endorsement of the death penalty even though both are devout Catholics.

It's common for Republican candidates to express their anti-abortion positions in GOP-dominant Idaho. However, many stress the importance of educating women on alternative options to an unplanned pregnancy or making access to abortion clinics more difficult rather than focus on possible punishment for the woman.

A handful of anti-abortion advocates have begun increasing their call for stricter penalties for women and providers.

Last year, Abolish Abortion Idaho launched a ballot initiative seeking to charge both abortion providers and women with 1st-degree murder - but it is unclear if the group will have enough signatures to make it on the ballot in November.

Meanwhile, Republican state Sen. Dan Foreman attempted to introduce legislation that would also classify abortion as 1st-degree murder for mothers and doctors, but the proposal never received a hearing.

Nonini was joined at Monday's forum by 2 other Republican candidates: Idaho Falls businesswoman Janice McGeachin and former Idaho Republican Party Chairman Steve Yates.

5 Republicans are running in the May primary election after incumbent GOP Lt. Gov. Brad Little announced he would run for governor, but only Nonini, Idaho Falls businesswoman Janice McGeachin and former Idaho Republican Party Chairman Steve Yates were invited to attend the forum.

Both McGeachin and Yates say abortion is murder, but stopped short of supporting charging women with 1st-degree murder for undergoing the procedure.

"No, I cannot support a woman facing the death penalty for having an abortion," said McGeachin. "What we should do is prevent that."

Yates downplayed that criminalizing abortion would result in fewer women seeking the procedure.

"In terms of criminalizing things, I have no problem with that except that doesn't always solve the problem," Yates said.

Nonini's comments echo similar rhetoric said by Donald Trump during the presidential campaign. In 2016, Trump came out in support of "some sort of punishment" for women who get abortions, but the campaign later backtracked that he believes abortion providers should be the ones punished.

Source: The Associated Press, April 4, 2018


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"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

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