FEATURED POST

Iran: The death penalty is an inhumane punishment for death row prisoners, their families and society as a whole

Image
"Whether guilty or not, the outcome of the death penalty is the same. In Iran, the death penalty is by hanging, and it takes from several agonising seconds to several harrowing minutes for death to occur and for everything to be over."

Every year several hundred people are executed by the Iranian authorities.
According to reports by Iran Human Rights (IHR) and other human rights groups, death row prisoners have often no access to a defence lawyer after their arrest and are sentenced to death following unfair trials and based on confessions extracted from them under torture. 
These are issues which have been addressed in IHR’s previous reports. The current report is based on first-hand accounts of several inmates held in Iran's prisons and their families. The report seeks to illustrate other aspects of how the death penalty affects the inmate, their families and, as a consequence, society.
How does a death row inmate experience his final hours?
Speaking about the final ho…

Trump's complicated past with the death penalty and due process

Donald Trump
WASHINGTON (CNN) -- President Donald Trump suggested imposing the death penalty for drug dealers at a Pennsylvania rally Saturday night, praising countries like China and Indonesia for their harsh punishments for drug offenses.

"When I was in China and other places, by the way, I said, 'Mr. President, do you have a drug problem? No, no, no, we do not. ... I said what do you attribute that to? Well, the death penalty,'" he recounted on Saturday night. "Honestly, I don't know that the United States frankly is ready for it. They should be ready for it."

The recommendation comes after other calls for capital punishment from the White House: In November, Trump criticized a military judge who gave Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl no prison time after previously tweeting that the former Taliban prisoner should "face the death penalty."

The President also tweeted that the suspect accused of killing eight people by driving a truck down a Manhattan bike path in an alleged terrorist attack "SHOULD GET DEATH PENALTY!" -- the first time he tweeted a call for capital punishment as sitting President.

Legal experts said the President's comment could entangle prosecutors as they seek to seat an unbiased jury and deliberate over what punishment to seek.

For much of his public life, Trump has consistently called for capital punishment against some of America's most high-profile criminals. But he's done so with limited concern for due process -- in both the justice system and the method of execution itself -- which courts have shaped and ethicists have debated in the US for decades.

Trump has called for the death penalty more than a dozen times in the last five years, including:

On Drew Peterson, who gained national headlines after the disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacy, Trump tweeted to "change the law" and "bring back the death penalty!"Trump called for the "DEATH PENALTY!" in a tweet against the "deranged animals" who killed two police officers in Mississippi in 2015.He also tweeted that Jared Lee Loughner, who shot former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and killed a half dozen others in 2011, "should be given the death penalty, not his plea bargained life in prison -- which will cost the taxpayers many millions of dollars."

But it's not just the use of capital punishment that Trump has pushed for. He's also called for expediting the judicial process and hinted at skirting the justice system's due process and implementing more brutal methods of execution.

In one tweet against the Aurora, Colorado, shooter James Holmes, who shot 82 people in a movie theater, Trump called for a "fast trial" and for lawmakers to "immediately pass speed up legbostoislation."On a gunman who shot and killed a former coworker at the Empire State Building in 2012, Trump recommended "fast trials and death penalty."In the case of Boston Marathon bomber, Trump tweeted for a "quick trial, then death penalty."After a string of missing children in October 2012, Trump called for "fast trial" and "death penalty" on Twitter.

But he's also entertained more gruesome methods of execution. He also called for a "very fast trial and then the death penalty" against "the animal" who beheaded a woman in Oklahoma in September 2014, then tweeting "the same fate - beheading?"

And in a February 2016 speech on the campaign trail, Trump mocked people who consider the death penalty unconstitutional and develop humane methods of execution while talking about the fight against ISIS and the immigration system.

"It's like these guys that commit murder, right? They commit murder. They kill someone. ... They go to jail. 'We don't want the death penalty. It's cruel and unusual punishment,'" he said. "And then you have another case when they get the death penalty, want to give them drugs to put them to sleep quietly and this. Look, we're in a fight for our lives."

Capital punishment is legal in 31 states and the federal government, according to the National Conference for State Legislatures.

On the campaign trail ahead of the Iowa caucuses, Trump proposed an executive order requiring mandatory capital punishment for killing a police officer. Legal experts highlighted multiple constitutional concerns with the proposal at the time.

Trump's support for the death penalty stretches back decades, when he ran multiple full-page ads in New York City newspapers in 1989 following the rape and assault of a Central Park jogger.

In the full-page ads, Trump said that "our society will rot away" until capital punishment is used more commonly. "I no longer want to understand their anger. I want them to understand our anger. I want them to be afraid," he wrote. "They should be forced to suffer and, when they kill, they should be executed for their crimes.''

Trump interviewed with Playboy on the topic the next year. "When a man or woman cold-bloodedly murders, he or she should pay. It sets an example. Nobody can make the argument that the death penalty isn't a deterrent. Either it will be brought back swiftly or our society will rot away. It is rotting away," he said.

Trump's desire to expedite the justice system hasn't stopped at capital punishment. When asked on "Fox and Friends" in April 2013, he said he supported nixing the US Supreme Court's requirement that suspects be read their rights to remain silence and obtain a lawyer at apprehension -- dubbed Miranda rights.

"I don't think so at all," Trump said in 2013 when asked whether he thought police ought to maintain the Miranda requirement.

"What I don't like seeing is a lot of people are saying we did something wrong," he said, lamenting questions at the time over whether a Boston Marathon bombing suspect was read his Miranda rights properly. "Here we go again, I mean I see it all the time. We did something wrong. We didn't read their rights. They weren't told of their rights."

"You know we have to get back to business in this country. This is disgraceful," he said.

Source: CNN, Ryan Struyk, March 11, 2018


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Texas executes Joseph Garcia

Tennessee: David Earl Miller moved to death watch as his execution approaches

Tennessee executes David Earl Miller

Death penalty in Tennessee: What I saw when I watched David Earl Miller die on the electric chair

'A simmering rage': David Earl Miller's path to Tennessee's electric chair

Hours before execution, Tennessee governor rejects killer’s plea for mercy

ISIS militant who beheaded a former Army Ranger killed by US airstrike

Texas ready to execute member of 'Texas 7' for policeman's murder

Iranian Juvenile Offender Milad Azimi Saved from Execution

Mississippi justices reject challenges over execution drug