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America Is Stuck With the Death Penalty for (At Least) a Generation

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With Justice Anthony Kennedy's retirement, the national fight to abolish capital punishment will have to go local.
When the Supreme Court revived capital punishment in 1976, just four years after de facto abolishing it, the justices effectively took ownership of the American death penalty and all its outcomes. They have spent the decades since then setting its legal and constitutional parameters, supervising its general implementation, sanctioning its use in specific cases, and brushing aside concerns about its many flaws.
That unusual role in the American legal system is about to change. With Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement from the court this summer, the Supreme Court will lose a heterodox jurist whose willingness to cross ideological divides made him the deciding factor in many legal battles. In cases involving the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment, his judgment often meant the difference between life and death for hundreds of death-row pr…

Saudi Arabia: New anti-terror laws include death penalty

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The newly announced laws against terrorism and its funding include the death penalty.

The new laws state that individuals defaming and publicly insulting the King and the Crown Prince will be sentenced to 5 to 10 years of imprisonment.

Terrorists conducting terror attacks while carrying arms and explosives will face 10 to 30 years in prison.

Terrorists establishing a terrorist cell or leading one will face 10 to 25 years in prison.

Individuals receiving training from terrorist organizations on using arms, explosives, chemical substances, wired and wireless telecommunication devices and ways to smuggle them into the Kingdom will face 20 to 30 years in prison.

Individuals who entice and coax another person to join a terrorist organization will face 8 to 25 years in prison.

Individuals who set up a training camp or manage one or get training in such a camp will face 10 to 20 years in prison.

The punishment will be harsher for individuals with a military background. They may face 20 to 30 years of imprisonment.

Individuals who help terrorists with weapons in any way will face 10 to 30 years in prison.

Individuals who misuse their status in any way either academic or social status or media influence to promote terrorism will face a maximum of 15 years in prison.

Individuals who forge documents for terrorist operations and get training on martial arts for terrorist operations will face 10 to 30 years in prison.

Individuals who smuggle explosives, atomic substances or wired or wireless communication devices will face 15 to 20 years in prison.

Individuals conducting a terror attack that results in the death of 1 or more people will face the death penalty.

Individuals may face a fine of a minimum of SR3 million and a maximum of SR10 million for funding terrorist operations.

The specialized court has the authority to freeze the individual's financial accounts and transactions or to appoint a judicial guard to manage the individual's money and transactions.

The court also has the authority to publicize the individual's crime and penalty.

The new laws also include protecting witnesses and keeping their identities confidential.

Source: Saudi Gazette, November 6, 2017


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"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

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