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Anthony Ray Hinton Spent Almost 30 Years on Death Row. Now He Has a Message for White America.

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Anthony Ray Hinton was mowing the lawn at his mother's house in 1985 when Alabama police came to arrest him for 2 murders he did not commit. One took place when he was working the night shift at a Birmingham warehouse. Yet the state won a death sentence, based on 2 bullets it falsely claimed matched a gun found at his mother's home. In his powerful new memoir, "The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row," Hinton describes how racism and a system stacked against the poor were the driving forces behind his conviction. He also writes about the unique and unexpected bonds that can form on death row, and in particular about his relationship with Henry Hays, a former Klansman sentenced to death for a notorious lynching in 1981. Hays died in the electric chair in 1997 - 1 of 54 people executed in Alabama while Hinton was on death row.
After almost 30 years, Hinton was finally exonerated in 2015, thanks to the Equal Justice Initiative, or EJI. On April 27…

US Supreme Court denies stay of execution for Ohio convict

Ronald Phillips
Ronald Phillips
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- A condemned child killer was scheduled to die on Wednesday in the state's first execution in more than three years after the U.S. Supreme Court denied his requests for more time to pursue legal challenges.

Ronald Phillips was transported to the death house at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility in Lucasville on Tuesday morning, about 24 hours before his execution was planned. He was convicted of the 1993 rape and killing of his girlfriend's 3-year-old daughter in Akron.

Justices denied the 43-year-old Phillips a stay on three requests, with a pair of justices dissenting on a request by Phillips that was joined by two other death row inmates with upcoming execution dates. The inmates had asked the court for a delay while they continue challenging Ohio's new lethal-injection method.

Justices Sonia Sotomayor, joined by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, dissented, arguing the inmates had demonstrated a likelihood of success at trial. Sotomayor objected to the court's "failure to step in when significant issues of life and death are present." [DPN notes that anti-death penalty Justice Stephen Breyer didn't dissent.]

The death penalty has been on hold in Ohio since January 2014, when a condemned inmate repeatedly gasped and snorted during a 26-minute procedure with a never-before-tried drug combination. Republican Gov. John Kasich halted upcoming executions after that, and delays have continued because the state had trouble finding new supplies of drugs and death row inmates sued on the grounds the state's proposed new three-drug execution method represented "cruel and unusual punishment."

Phillips' arguments were backed up by 15 pharmacology professors, who stepped in Monday to argue that a sedative used in the process, midazolam, is incapable of inducing unconsciousness or preventing serious pain.

A federal court last month upheld the use of midazolam, which has been problematic in several executions, including Ohio's in 2014 and others in Arkansas and Arizona.

Phillips also sought a delay based on his age at the time of the killing. He was 19, older than the Supreme Court's cutoff of 18 for the purposes of barring executions of juveniles. His request argued the age should be 21. His lawyers said he had such "psychosocial deficits" when he was picked up by police that they initially took him to a juvenile, rather than an adult, facility.

Attorneys for the state argued Phillips made meritless, often conflicting, legal claims.

Midazolam"Phillips argues that youth, like IQ, cannot be reduced to a number. But he also argues that the Eighth Amendment prohibits the execution of adults under age twenty-one," they wrote in a court document filed Tuesday. "He cannot have it both ways; if age cannot make one eligible for death, it cannot make one ineligible for death."

They added that continued delays in Phillips' case were harming the state by costing time and resources.

Phillips has had several previous delays to scheduled executions, most notably in 2013, when he made a last-minute plea to donate his organs. He said that he wanted to give a kidney to his mother, who was on dialysis, and possibly his heart to his sister. His request was denied. His mother has since died.

Phillips was being permitted to see family, friends, spiritual advisers and attorneys on Tuesday and Wednesday morning. For his last meal Tuesday evening, he requested a large cheese pizza with bell pepper and mushrooms, a 2-liter bottle of Pepsi and strawberry cheesecake, along with grape juice and a piece of unleavened bread.

Source: Associated Press, July 25, 2017


ABA expresses concern about Ohio plan to resume executions


The ABA is "deeply concerned" about Ohio's plans to resume executions, according to a statement by ABA President Linda A. Klein.

Ohio has not implemented important reforms to improve the accuracy and fairness of the death penalty that were recommended in a 2007 report, according to Klein's statement.

The ABA had worked with Ohio experts to produce the report, which found geographic and racial bias had resulted in inconsistent and unfair administration of the death penalty. The report also found inadequate protections for defendants with mental illnesses.

Ohio has not executed an inmate since January 2014, when inmate Dennis McGuire gasped for air and made guttural noises for about 10 minutes during a longer-than usual execution process, the Associated Press reports. The execution used a 2-drug cocktail, the Akron Beacon Journal reports.

Executions are set to resume Wednesday when Ronald Phillips is scheduled to die for the 1993 rape and murder of his girlfriend's 3-year-old daughter. The state will use 3 drugs in the execution.

The ABA does not take a position on the death penalty as a means of punishment, but it does believe the death penalty should be implemented fairly, accurately and with due process.

Ohio has implemented a handful of death-penalty reforms in the last few years, but a majority of the recommendations in the 2007 report have not been implemented, Klein says in the statement.

Source: abajournal.com, July 25, 2017

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