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Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

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The fire moved quickly through the house, a one-story wood-frame structure in a working-class neighborhood of Corsicana, in northeast Texas. Flames spread along the walls, bursting through doorways, blistering paint and tiles and furniture. Smoke pressed against the ceiling, then banked downward, seeping into each room and through crevices in the windows, staining the morning sky.
Buffie Barbee, who was eleven years old and lived two houses down, was playing in her back yard when she smelled the smoke. She ran inside and told her mother, Diane, and they hurried up the street; that’s when they saw the smoldering house and Cameron Todd Willingham standing on the front porch, wearing only a pair of jeans, his chest blackened with soot, his hair and eyelids singed. He was screaming, “My babies are burning up!” His children—Karmon and Kameron, who were one-year-old twin girls, and two-year-old Amber—were trapped inside.
Willingham told the Barbees to call the Fire Department, and while Dia…

Georgia Death Row Inmates' Last Words: Apologies, Thanks, Defiance

Georgia's death chamber
Georgia's death chamber
Georgia inmate J.W. Ledford Jr. used his final moments to quote from the movie "Cool Hand Luke" and toss out an insult.

"What we have here is a failure to communicate. Some men you just can't reach. So that's why we have here what we have here today. I am not the failure. You are the failure to communicate," Ledford said just after 1 a.m. on May 17, before a lethal dose of the barbiturate pentobarbital began to flow into his veins.

"You can kiss my white trash ass," he added. "I'm just shaking the bush boss, let's do it."

It was one of the more unusual statements made by a Georgia death row inmate in the final moments. Strapped to a gurney that's tilted toward the witness seats, condemned inmates are given two minutes to make a last statement.

Many apologize to the families of their victims or thank their own families, friends and lawyers for support. Others insist they are innocent or rail against the justice system that put them there.

Georgia is the rare state that makes audio recordings of condemned inmates' final statements in the execution chamber.

The Associated Press obtained copies of those recordings (transcripts and audio) through an open records request. Some inmates chose not to make a final statement in the execution chamber.

Kelly Gissendaner, who was the only woman on Georgia's death row when she was executed in September 2015, sobbed through apologies to the family of her husband, Douglas Gissendaner, whom she had conspired to have her lover kill. Then she sang "Amazing Grace" as the lethal drug flowed, though the microphones had already been turned off by then.

Troy Davis, who inspired rallies and vigils in multiple countries after his guilt was questioned, maintained his innocence until the end, insisting from the gurney in September 2011 that he did not kill off-duty Savannah police Officer Mark MacPhail.

Source: The Associated Press, May 24, 2017

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