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Iran: The death penalty is an inhumane punishment for death row prisoners, their families and society as a whole

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"Whether guilty or not, the outcome of the death penalty is the same. In Iran, the death penalty is by hanging, and it takes from several agonising seconds to several harrowing minutes for death to occur and for everything to be over."

Every year several hundred people are executed by the Iranian authorities.
According to reports by Iran Human Rights (IHR) and other human rights groups, death row prisoners have often no access to a defence lawyer after their arrest and are sentenced to death following unfair trials and based on confessions extracted from them under torture. 
These are issues which have been addressed in IHR’s previous reports. The current report is based on first-hand accounts of several inmates held in Iran's prisons and their families. The report seeks to illustrate other aspects of how the death penalty affects the inmate, their families and, as a consequence, society.
How does a death row inmate experience his final hours?
Speaking about the final ho…

Bali Nine smugglers were lost in translation in Indonesian prison

Bali's Kerobokan prison, Indonesia
Bali's Kerobokan prison, Indonesia
A friend of Bali Nine smuggler Myuran Sukumaran has revealed prison guards only spoke in Indonesian leaving inmates who did not speak the language not knowing their fate.

Ben Quilty, an artist and Archibald winner, spent time with the convicted drug smuggler in [Bali's infamous Kerobokan prison].

More than a year after Sukumaran faced the firing squad, Quilty has revealed his executed friend was aggrieved that non-Indonesian speaking prisoners had no idea what was going on.

'Myuran was very angry about this,' Quilty told News Corp.

'The guards spoke a bit of broken English but all of the directions were given in Indonesian, and they [prisoners] relied on those people having a translator.'

Quilty said Sukumaran and Andrew Chan, another executed member of the Bali Nine, became well respected because of the care they showed when new prisoners entered the formidable prison and became lost in translation.

'Myuran and Andrew were translating Indonesian into English to try to help them understand what was going on.'

Quilty was introduced to Sukumaran in 2012 after the imprisoned man expressed a desire to paint.

After visiting the jail when Sukumaran's lawyer contacted him and showed him his art studio, the pair struck up a friendship.

'Rest in peace Myu, with a brush in your hand my friend,' Quilty wrote in a Facebook post on the one-year anniversary of his death.

'One year today. Seems a little like it was all just a really bad dream, like when you're a kid with a temperature and the nightmares rollick through your tiny brain.

'Myu was the bravest man I've met. Next year you will prove again to the world the outcome of rehabilitation, the profound importance of forgiveness and compassion and most importantly of all the power of art.'

Sukumaran and Chan were were executed in April 2015 - 10 years after being found guilty of smuggling 8.3kg of heroin out of Indonesia.

Source: Mail Online, January 29, 2017

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