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This is America: 9 out of 10 public schools now hold mass shooting drills for students

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How "active shooter" drills became normal for a generation of American schoolchildren.
"Are you kids good at running and screaming?" a police officer asks a class of elementary school kids in Akron, Ohio.
His friendly tone then turns serious.
“What I don’t want you to do is hide in the corner if a bad guy comes in the room,” he says. "You gotta get moving."
This training session — shared online by the ALICE Training Institute, a civilian safety training company — reflects the new normal at American public schools. As armed shooters continue their deadly rampages, and while Washington remains stuck on gun control, a new generation of American students have learned to lock and barricade their classroom doors the same way they learn to drop and roll in case of a fire.
The training session is a stark reminder of how American schools have changed since the 1999 Columbine school shooting. School administrators and state lawmakers have realized that a mass shoot…

USA: Execution drop makes some think death penalty is fading away

Is the death penalty in America gradually dying? There have been just 2 executions since May 1 and the total for 2016 probably will hit a 25-year low.

Execution drug shortages, sometimes grotesque errors in death chambers and legal challenges to sentences imposed by judges have contributed to a dramatic decline in the number of states that are carrying out executions.

Just 3 states, Texas, Georgia and Missouri, are using the death penalty with any regularity, though Texas has not executed anyone since April. 4 executions are scheduled in the state before the end of the year.

The reduction in executions and in the number of states that are enforcing death sentences led Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to conclude recently, "I think the death penalty is fading away." There is not enough support on the court to abolish capital punishment, Ginsburg said, but added that may not be necessary.

"Most states don't have any executions. The executions that we have are very heavily concentrated in a few states and even a few counties within those states," she said in an interview with The Associated Press in July. Ginsburg joined a lengthy dissenting opinion by Justice Stephen Breyer last year that highlighted problems with the death penalty that led the 2 justices to conclude that it probably is unconstitutional.

States that have had to halt executions, though, are trying to figure out how to resume. Ohio and Oklahoma are among states that intend to re-start executions once they have corrected well-publicized problems in their death chambers.

Ohio, which last executed an inmate in January 2014, has set a January 12 execution date for a man convicted of raping and killing a three-year-old girl in Akron. But it's unclear whether his execution, or more than two dozen others that are scheduled into 2020, will take place because the state lacks lethal execution drugs and has struggled to find a supplier, as have other states.

In Ohio's last execution, in January 2014, Dennis McGuire gasped and snorted repeatedly during a 26-minute execution that used a never before tried combination of 2 drugs. That protocol has since been eliminated and those drugs aren't available for executions.

Oklahoma last execution was in January 2015, amid the use of the wrong drug and other problems. The state's prison system is expected to adopt new execution procedures soon. Even then, Attorney General Scott Pruitt says he will wait at least another 5 months before asking a court to schedule an execution.

Oklahoma imposed a moratorium on the death penalty after two problem-filled executions and a third that was called off when prison officials noticed they received the wrong drug. The top lawyer for Gov. Mary Fallin urged officials to go forward anyway, telling another lawyer to "Google it" to confirm the drug could be used, according to a grand jury investigation.

Alabama and Florida haven't put anyone to death since January because of questions about the way death sentences are imposed in those states.

Even Texas has seen a reduction in executions. The state's highest criminal appeals court has stopped 4 executions in the past month, though each case raised different issues. Separately, the Supreme Court will take up 2 Texas death row cases in the coming months, also involving discrete issues.

California has the largest death-row population, 746 inmates as of early August, but hasn't executed anyone in 10 years. Voters in the nation's most populous state will consider separate ballot questions in November that would abolish the death penalty on the one hand and speed up the appeals process on the other.

The longer states go without executions, the harder it may be for them to resume, said Robert Dunham, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center.

"The law of inertia is that a body in motion tends to stay in motion. A body at rest tends to stay at rest. There are policy parallels for that with the death penalty. Right now most states are comfortable not executing anybody. And for the most part, the public is comfortable, even in death penalty states, with their states not executing anybody," Dunham said.

At the current pace, there would be 19 executions this year, the fewest since 1991, when 14 people were put to death.

The number of new death sentences also is approaching historic lows as most jurisdictions are forgoing costly capital trials in favor of seeking life sentences with no chance of parole. Texas, which has executed more people since the modern resumption of the death penalty in 1976 than the next 6 states combined, had only 2 new death sentences last year.

Many of the executions that are being carried out are for crimes committed up to 30 years ago, before some states enhanced the legal representation in capital cases, said Stephen Bright, an experienced death penalty lawyer who is president of the Southern Center for Human Rights.

"There are a lot of people who are getting executed who would never be sentenced to death today," Bright said.

Source: Associated Press, September 6, 2016

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