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Anthony Ray Hinton Spent Almost 30 Years on Death Row. Now He Has a Message for White America.

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Anthony Ray Hinton was mowing the lawn at his mother's house in 1985 when Alabama police came to arrest him for 2 murders he did not commit. One took place when he was working the night shift at a Birmingham warehouse. Yet the state won a death sentence, based on 2 bullets it falsely claimed matched a gun found at his mother's home. In his powerful new memoir, "The Sun Does Shine: How I Found Life and Freedom on Death Row," Hinton describes how racism and a system stacked against the poor were the driving forces behind his conviction. He also writes about the unique and unexpected bonds that can form on death row, and in particular about his relationship with Henry Hays, a former Klansman sentenced to death for a notorious lynching in 1981. Hays died in the electric chair in 1997 - 1 of 54 people executed in Alabama while Hinton was on death row.
After almost 30 years, Hinton was finally exonerated in 2015, thanks to the Equal Justice Initiative, or EJI. On April 27…

Tweet Proclaiming Atheism Lands Saudi Man 2,000 Lashes, 10 Years Behind Bars

Saudi Arabia has sentenced a 28-year-old man to 10 years in prison and 2,000 lashes for tweeting that he is an atheist.

The nation’s strict Sharia law defines atheism as “terrorism,” and the man refused to take back his words, insisting that he has a right to express his lack of belief. 

Saudi religious police who monitor social networks found over 600 tweets from the man, mocking the Koran and stating that teachings of the prophet Muhammad's lies stokes cultural hostility. 

In addition to imprisonment and violent punishment, he was also fined 20,000 riyals (over $5,300). 

Laws defining atheism as terrorism were introduced under King Abdullah in 2014, aimed at stopping political and religious dissent that could “harm public order.” 

In 2012, blogger and activist Raif Badawi, 32, ran a website called “Free Saudi Liberals” and was arrested for "insulting Islam through electronic channels,” "setting up a website that undermines general security," "ridiculing Islamic religious figures," and "going beyond the realm of obedience.” 

He was sentenced in 2014 to 10 years in prison, 1000 lashes, and a fine of 1 million riyals, with the public whipping take take place over a period of 20 weeks.

His wife, relatives, and activists have consistently pleaded with Saudi Arabia to stop the lashings, fearing that Badawi will not survive. "The first lashing session was tough — it took a toll on his fragile body," Dr. Elham Manea, a friend and spokesperson of the family, told Mashable at the time. "His health condition is not that good at all. We are glad that this medical examination has confirmed that he is not fit to be flogged again." 

The whippings began January 9, 2015, and sparked a massive international outcry. Top United Nations officials called the flogging, “a form of cruel and unusual punishment,” and a petition from Amnesty International received nearly a million signatures. 

In a video of the lashing, he is repeatedly struck as the crowd shouts "Allahu Akbar!" (God is great), while officials warn that no cellphone recording is allowed.

Source: Sputnik News, August 31, 2016

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