FEATURED POST

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Image
The fire moved quickly through the house, a one-story wood-frame structure in a working-class neighborhood of Corsicana, in northeast Texas. Flames spread along the walls, bursting through doorways, blistering paint and tiles and furniture. Smoke pressed against the ceiling, then banked downward, seeping into each room and through crevices in the windows, staining the morning sky.
Buffie Barbee, who was eleven years old and lived two houses down, was playing in her back yard when she smelled the smoke. She ran inside and told her mother, Diane, and they hurried up the street; that’s when they saw the smoldering house and Cameron Todd Willingham standing on the front porch, wearing only a pair of jeans, his chest blackened with soot, his hair and eyelids singed. He was screaming, “My babies are burning up!” His children—Karmon and Kameron, who were one-year-old twin girls, and two-year-old Amber—were trapped inside.
Willingham told the Barbees to call the Fire Department, and while Dia…

Catholic Bishops of Nebraska Say Death Penalty 'not necessary to protect society'

Gathering signatures against the Nebraska repeal of the death penalty
Gathering signatures against the Nebraska repeal of the death penalty
The 3 bishops in charge of the 375,000 Catholics in 350 Nebraska parishes have officially come out as opponents of the death penalty, as the issue takes center stage with a statewide vote coming in November.

On Thursday, Tom Venzor executive director of the Catholic Conference of Nebraska and public policy voice of the 3 Nebraska bishops, says the bishops all agree that the death penalty "is not necessary to protect society."

This comes just 1 month before Nebraskans will vote to either keep the repeal of the death penalty, that state legislators made law in May of 2015, or to bring back the option of the death penalty.

The recommendation from the 3 bishops, Bishop James Conley of Lincoln, Archbishop George Lucas of Omaha and Bishop Joseph Hanefeldt of the Grand Island diocese, comes as no surprise with all 3 pledging their support for the initial repeal of the death penalty in 2015.

They said at that time they don't believe that the penalty of death is a just option.

"Justice requires punishment, but it does not require that those who have committed serious crimes be put to death."

In the Thursday news conference, Venzor called the death penalty "a broken system" and also cited the fact that the past 3 popes, Pope John Paul II, Pope Benedict XVI and current Pope Francis, all spoke against capital punishment.

Other reasons Venzor recommends Catholics vote RETAIN on November 8th, include the possibility of wrongful convictions, minority discrimination, the long appeals process and high taxpayer costs associated with the death penalty.

Source: KWBE news, September 30, 2016

⚑ | Report an error, an omission; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; send a submission; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Iran: Three Hand Amputations, Four Hangings Carried Out in Qom

Iran: Woman Asylum Seeker Lashed 80 Times After Being Deported From Norway

Iran: Three executions carried out, two in front of large crowds

Gambia: President Barrow Signs Abolition Of Death Penalty Treaty

Texas Child Killer John Battaglia Found Competent for Execution

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Two Myanmar migrants make final appeal in Koh Tao murder case

Kenya: Man to hang for stealing toothpaste and toothbrush

Judge warns death row inmate to keep Nevada's execution manual secret

Seventeen Hanged in Various Iranian Prisons, One in Public