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To beat the clock on the expiration of its lethal injection drug supply, this past April, Arkansas tried to execute 8 men over 1 days. The stories told in frantic legal filings and clemency petitions revealed a deeply disturbing picture. Ledell Lee may have had an intellectual disability that rendered him constitutionally ineligible for the death penalty, but he had a spate of bad lawyers who failed to timely present evidence of this claim -…

Family of Spaniard Pablo Ibar cautious ahead of new trial

Pablo Ibar
Pablo Ibar
Kin of Spaniard on death row in U.S. cautious ahead of new trial

Family and supporters of Pablo Ibar, a Spanish citizen sentenced to death in Florida for a 1994 triple-murder, said here Thursday that while they welcome a decision to grant him a new trial, they remain wary.

Ibar's father and cousin and the spokesman for the Pablo Ibar Association Against the Death Penalty, Andres Krakenberger, met Thursday morning with the president of the Basque regional parliament, Bakartxo Tejeria, and other lawmakers.

After the round of meetings, they told reporters they hope to convince the parliament to issue an institutional declaration in favor of Ibar.

Krakenberger said the different parties have been favorable to supporting this cause "of evident injustice."

In February, the Florida Supreme Court overturned the 2000 murder conviction of the 45-year-old Ibar, who has been imprisoned for almost 22 years, 15 of them on death row.

The 4-3 decision means Ibar will get a new trial on charges he took part in the 1994 murders of nightclub owner Casimir "Butch Casey" Sucharski, 48, and models Sharon Anderson and Marie Rogers, both 25.

The Supreme Court on Wednesday formally returned the case to a court in Broward County, just north of Miami, where the crime took place.

Krakenberger said Thursday that though the new trial should begin within 90 days, there is a series of variables that could influence the situation, including the fact that the prosecution may ask for a postponement.

Despite the fact that they're optimistic, Krakenberger urged people not to "lower your guard" or to "celebrate," because prosecutors continue to seek the death penalty for Ibar.

When asked about how the citizen and institutional campaign is going to collect the funds needed to pay for the cost of a new trial, Krakenberger said that they have a little over half the required money in hand and that the lawyers have begun working on the pretrial preparations.

Ibar's father Candido said that the family is encouraged and hopeful, adding that his son is doing well, although he's also a little "nervous" about the new phase that's beginning now.

Source: Fox news, May 2, 2016

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