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A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof

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“What are you?” a member of the Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston asked at the trial of the white man who killed eight of her fellow black parishioners and their pastor. “What kind of subhuman miscreant could commit such evil?... What happened to you, Dylann?”
Rachel Kaadzi Ghansah spent months in South Carolina searching for an answer to those questions—speaking with Roof’s mother, father, friends, former teachers, and victims’ family members, all in an effort to unlock what went into creating one of the coldest killers of our time.
Sitting beside the church, drinking from a bottle of Smirnoff Ice, he thought he had to go in and shoot them.
They were a small prayer group—a rising-star preacher, an elderly minister, eight women, one young man, and a little girl. But to him, they were a problem. He believed that, as black Americans, they were raping “our women and are taking over our country.” So he took out his Glock handgun and calmly, while their eyes were closed in prayer, ope…

Bangladesh Supreme Court defers hearing Nizami's review petition

The Supreme Court of Bangladesh
The Supreme Court of Bangladesh
The hearing of a petition filed by war crimes convict Motiur Rahman Nizami to review the verdict upholding his death sentence has been deferred.

The matter was included in the Supreme Court's cause list for Sunday.

But after Nizami's counsels pleaded for more time on Sunday, the Appellate Division bench, led by Chief Justice Surendra Kumar Sinha, deferred the hearing by a week.

"Not this week," said the court.

"We pleaded for 6 weeks; the court gave us 1 week. The matter will be heard after that," Nizami's lawyer SM Shahjahan told bdnews24.com after the hearing.

On Mar 29, the Jamaat-e-Islami chief filed the petition seeking review of the Supreme Court verdict, which confirmed his death penalty for 1971 war crimes.

The next day, the State moved the Supreme Court's chamber judge to expedite the hearing, when it forwarded the matter to a regular appeals bench and fixed Sunday for the hearing.

In January this year, the top court rejected Nizami's appeal to overturn the International Crimes Tribunal's 2014 verdict.

As the head of the Jamaat's student wing Islami Chhatra Sangha ( in 1971), Nizami commanded the Al-Badr, a militia known for its ruthless mass murders, rape, loot and the killing of Bengali intellectuals in support of Pakistan's campaign to suppress the Bengali freedom struggle.

Review is the last legal recourse for a death-row convict after all other judicial options have been exhausted.

The option to seek presidential mercy provides the only remaining hope ahead of execution in case the review is rejected.

On Mar 16, the death warrant issued by the tribunal was read out to Nizami after the Supreme Court published the full copy of his verdict.

Nizami's case is the 6th of the war crimes cases so far to reach the stage of a review petition after the publication of the full verdict.

The 72-year-old is the 3rd former minister facing the gallows for war crimes.

Nizami, industries minister during the BNP-led coalition government from 2001-06, was also handed the death penalty in 2014 for involvement in arms trafficking in Chittagong's sensational 10-truck arms haul case.

Source: bdnews24.com, April 3, 2016

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