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No Second Chances: What to Do After a Botched Execution

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Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. The state shouldn't get a second chance.
The pathos and problems of America's death penalty were vividly on display yesterday when Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. Immediately after its failure Gov. John Kasich set June 5, 2019, as a new execution date.
This plan for a second execution reveals a glaring inadequacy in the legal standards governing botched executions in the United States.
Campbell was tried and sentenced to die for murdering 18-year-old Charles Dials during a carjacking in 1997. After Campbell exhausted his legal appeals, he was denied clemency by the state parole board and the governor.
By the time the state got around to executing Campbell, he was far from the dangerous criminal of 20 years ago. As is the case with many of America's death-row inmates, the passage of time had inflicted its own punishments.
The inmate Ohio strapped onto the gurney was a 69-year-old man afflicted with serious ailm…

Saudi Arabia: Death penalty sought for 28 espionage suspects

Public beheading in Saudi Arabia
Public beheading in Saudi Arabia
Manama: A government prosecutor called for the death penalty for 28 suspects -- 27 Saudis and one Afghan -- and for severe jail terms for the remaining four, three Saudis and one Iranian.

A business analyst and a security serviceman are among the 32 people put on trial in Saudi Arabia this week for spying for Iran.

The 32 suspects are accused of high treason against the kingdom by collaborating with Iranian intelligence.

The security serviceman worked for a sector tasked with the security and safety of pilgrims, the court in the capital Riyadh heard as the last eight suspects, all Saudi nationals, went on trial on Tuesday, Saudi daily Okaz reported.

The serviceman asked the judges to name a lawyer to defend him, explaining that he did not have the financial resources to hire an attorney.

However, a judge told him that he would have to pay the state back in case it was found out that he was financially able to hire a lawyer, he changed his mind and said he would have his own lawyer, Okaz said.

Another suspect who pleaded to be bailed out was told that he needed the approval of the interior minister and that he should fill in an application.

Source: Gulf News, Feb. 25, 2016

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