FEATURED POST

This is America: 9 out of 10 public schools now hold mass shooting drills for students

Image
How "active shooter" drills became normal for a generation of American schoolchildren.
"Are you kids good at running and screaming?" a police officer asks a class of elementary school kids in Akron, Ohio.
His friendly tone then turns serious.
“What I don’t want you to do is hide in the corner if a bad guy comes in the room,” he says. "You gotta get moving."
This training session — shared online by the ALICE Training Institute, a civilian safety training company — reflects the new normal at American public schools. As armed shooters continue their deadly rampages, and while Washington remains stuck on gun control, a new generation of American students have learned to lock and barricade their classroom doors the same way they learn to drop and roll in case of a fire.
The training session is a stark reminder of how American schools have changed since the 1999 Columbine school shooting. School administrators and state lawmakers have realized that a mass shoot…

Arizona death row inmates asking state to not use a paralytic in executions

Arizona's death chamber
Arizona's death chamber
ARIZONA - Arizona death row inmates are asking the state to not use a paralyzing drug in their executions -- so witnesses can see them suffer.

The state said they're trying to create a "spectacle" and have no First Amendment right to "go viral."

The death row inmates, along with First Amendment organizations, are challenging the state's execution methods and attempting to get rid of one of the steps in the death penalty process.

The state of Arizona shot back at its death row inmates who challenged the state's use of paralytics in executions and are arguing that people have a constitutional right to see what's actually going on when someone is executed, Buzzfeed News reported Wednesday.

The state's method includes a three-drug protocol that is supposed to sedate and paralyze the person before killing them.

Death row inmates and a coalition of First Amendment organizations are arguing that the paralytic agent only prevents people from seeing the pain the inmates may experience and effectively undermines the purpose of witnesses.

"The press, the prisoners and the people of Arizona have a right to know whether Arizona's execution process subjects prisoners to intense physical pain, and the use of a paralytic agent is just as effective in preventing the disclosure of that fact as if the execution occurred without any public witness at all."

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich's office said last week that the First Amendment does not protect the right of the inmate to "die in what they speculate will be pain and distress, as long as people can watch."

"The First Amendment does not protect the right to create a spectacle and go viral," the statement said.

The state said inmates were trying to create "a spectacle with the objective of swaying public opinion and ultimately abolishing the death penalty."

Attorney David Weinzweig, who wrote the response for the state, said the department has been "forced" to change the drug protocols it uses in response to opponents of the death penalty. The response said people "wage guerilla warfare" to stop the state from "acquiring court-approved chemicals."

Arizona was forced to stop using its two-drug protocol after the killing of an inmate in 2014 took nearly two hours.

Source: The Hill, KPNX, Feb. 24, 2016

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 30 Days)

Florida: Emilia Carr resentenced to life in prison

British grandmother Lindsay Sandiford on death row in Bali faces losing last-ditch appeal

Texas: Supreme Court rejects Larry Swearingen's plea for DNA testing

Capital Punishment and Extreme Mental Torture

New Mexico: Swift end for House bill to reinstate death penalty

Iran Executed Three Juvenile Offenders in January

Indiana: Marcus Dansby's death penalty case rescheduled for spring of 2019

Nevada Inmate Serving 2 Life Terms Dead at Age 83, Decades After SCOTUS Overturned His Death Sentence

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

Texas: Father fights to save his son from death penalty after he killed his wife and youngest son in 2003