Iran: Annual report on the death penalty 2017

IRAN HUMAN RIGHTS (MARCH 13, 2018): The 10th annual report on the death penalty in Iran by Iran Human Rights (IHR) and ECPM shows that in 2017 at least 517 people were executed in the Islamic Republic of Iran. 
This number is comparable with the execution figures in 2016 and confirms the relative reduction in the use of the death penalty compared to the period between 2010 and 2015. 
Nevertheless, with an average of more than one execution every day and more than one execution per one million inhabitants in 2017, Iran remained the country with the highest number of executions per capita.
2017 Annual Report at a Glance:
At least 517 people were executed in 2017, an average of more than one execution per day111 executions (21%) were announced by official sources.Approximately 79% of all executions included in the 2017 report, i.e. 406 executions, were not announced by the authorities.At least 240 people (46% of all executions) were executed for murder charges - 98 more than in 2016.At le…

Texas prosecutor who sent man to death row for crime he didn’t commit seeks to keep law license

Anthony Graves
Anthony Graves
A lawyer for Charles Sebesta, the ex-prosecutor who secured the wrongful death sentence of Anthony Graves, told a panel of the State Bar of Texas on Friday that he should not be disbarred based on technicalities in the rules that govern lawyer discipline.

In June, the Texas State Bar revoked the law license of Sebesta, the former Burleson County district attorney, finding that he had engaged in prosecutorial misconduct in Graves’ wrongful conviction.

Graves was sentenced to death in 1994 and spent 18 years behind bars, including 12 on death row, for a fiery multiple murder. He was close to execution twice.

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned Graves’ conviction in 2010. The court found that Sebesta secured Graves’ conviction through several instances of prosecutorial wrongdoing, including withholding key evidence and suborning false testimony.

Sebesta appealed the disbarment, arguing that in 2007 the agency had already ruled that there was no cause to disbar him in response to an earlier complaint about his work in the Graves case.

In 2007, while Graves was still in prison, the Bar dismissed a complaint regarding Sebesta’s conduct in the case, finding that the statute of limitations on the alleged wrondgoing had expired.

Graves filed a new complaint in 2014, after lawmakers changed the statute of limitations for prosecutors accused of misconduct. Under the new law, those who have been wrongly convicted have up to four years after their release to seek discipline against prosecutors who engage in conduct such as withholding evidence and eliciting false testimony.

Jane Webre, who was defending Sebesta before the disciplinary board, argued that bar rules prevent the board from making a different ruling on Graves’ recent complaint after it already determined the former prosecutor wasn’t subject to disbarment for his role in that conviction.

Source: The Dallas Morning News, Brandi Grissom, January 29, 2016

- Report an error, an omission: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com - Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Singapore: Drug trafficker hanged after last-ditch bid to reopen case fails

Missouri inmate Russell Bucklew receives reprieve before execution

Iran: Two Brothers Hanged in Public over Armed Robbery Charges

Saudi Arabia beheads Indonesian worker despite Jokowi’s pleas for clemency

Texas: Court findings offer hope for death row inmate in case tainted by 'Dr. Death'

Gov. Kasich, heed Ohio Parole Board and don't execute William Montgomery

Alabama executes Michael Eggers

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

Death sentence reinstated for Mississippi's only woman on death row

Japan cult members could be hanged any day for subway attack