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America's Secret Death Penalty Drugs

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Governments have gone to great effort to keep the sources and methods of their death penalty regimes secret.
In November, the Omaha World-Herald sent a simple records request to the Nebraska state government. Along with several other news outlets, the paper wanted to know the source of the drugs to be used in an upcoming execution—the first in the state in more than 20 years.
In the past the Nebraska Department of Corrections would have provided this information, but now it refused. Officials there insisted that the supplier of the drugs the state intended to use, in the name of its citizens, to sedate, paralyze, and stop the beating heart of an inmate were exempt from Nebraska's public record law.
In December the Nebraska chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) sued to challenge the denial.
Nebraska is just the latest state to decide the executioner's black hood of anonymity also covers the pharmacies that mix the deadly compounds used to kill prisoners. As letha…

Filipino Murder Convict Executed in Saudi Arabia

Public beheading in Saudi Arabia
Public beheading in Saudi Arabia
A Filipino murder convict was publicly beheaded in Saudi Arabia on Tuesday after failing to meet the demand of the Sudanese victim's family for payment of $1 million to save him from the death penalty, officials said.

Joselito Lidasan Zapanta's execution was carried out after his family and the Philippine government managed to raise only 23 million pesos ($488,000), said Philippine Department of Foreign Affairs spokesman Charles Jose.

The victim's family refused to sign an affidavit of forgiveness that would have spared Zapanta the death penalty unless it was paid 48 million pesos ($1 million), setting a two-week deadline earlier this month for payment, Jose said.

Zapanta, a 35-year-old tile-setter, was convicted of murder and robbery by a Riyadh court in 2010.

The Department of Foreign Affairs said in a statement that the government "has undertaken and exhausted all diplomatic and legal efforts, and extended consular and legal assistance to preserve the life of Mr. Zapanta."

The plight of Filipino workers overseas is a sensitive issue in the Philippines. About a tenth of the country's 100 million people work abroad, including around 2.2 million in Saudi Arabia.

Jose said that 79 Filipinos are on death row in various countries, including 41 in Malaysia and 27 in Saudi Arabia.

Source: The Associated Press, December 29, 2015

Related content:

79 more Filipinos on death row abroad —DFA

Following the execution of Joselito Zapanta on Tuesday in Saudi Arabia, the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) revealed that 79 more Filipinos are on death row for various offenses abroad.

DFA spokesperson Charles Jose told GMA News Online on Tuesday that most of the Filipinos on death row are being held in Malaysia and their charges are mostly murder or related to illegal drugs.

The breakdown of Filipinos on death row, according to DFA:
  • Malaysia - 41
  • Thailand - 1
  • Indonesia - 1
  • Brunei - 2
  • Vietnam - 1
  • US - 2
  • Saudi Arabia - 27
  • Kuwait - 2
  • UAE - 1
  • Lebanon - 1

DFA's Office of the Undersecretary for Migrant Workers' Affairs (OUMWA) has yet to provide a breakdown of the charges.

Joselito Lidasan Zapanta
Joselito Lidasan Zapanta
Zapanta was executed on Tuesday, five years after he was convicted for killing a Sudanese national over rental dispute in April 2010. 

He was sentenced to death when the victim's family refused to accept blood money in exchange for a Tanazul or Affidavit of Forgiveness.

Zapanta's remains were buried right after his execution, in accordance with the burial tradition of Islam. Zapanta had converted to Islam years ago.

The DFA earlier offered its condolences to the family of Zapanta, which managed to raise only P23 million of the P48 million blood money being asked by the Sudanese national's family.

OFW group Migrante also offered its sympathy to Zapanta's family.

Migrante chairperson Connie Bragas-Regalado blamed the government for Zapanta's execution.

"This is another proof of government negligence. Its policy to provide legal assitance only when OFW is convicted and sentenced to death. Its failure will result to execution of our bagong bayani as in the case of Joselito," Regalado told GMA News Online. 

Source: ALG, GMA News, December 29, 2015

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