FEATURED POST

Human Rights: The Inhumane Regime of Iran

Image
Introduction
The Iranian regime is a theocratic state based on the principle of velayat-e faqih (absolute clerical rule). The authoritarian rulers of Iran violently clamp down on popular demands, including calls for greater personal freedoms and equality.
Freedom of assembly is effectively non-existent in Iran. That is why various social sectors are severely restricted and suppressed when they assembled to voice collective and basic demands. In this context, the Iranian people have increasingly called for the overthrow of the theocracy, believing it does not align with their democratic aspirations and inclination to join the international community as peaceful and responsible actors. In December 2017, people in more than 130 cities in all of Iran's provinces rose up against the regime in large numbers and demanded democratic change and separation of religion and state. The protestors were violently suppressed, with hundreds killed and thousands more jailed and tortured.
The cleri…

Romania: Ceausescu execution spot to become tourist attraction

The director of the museum in Targoviste gestures to the spot
where Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife Elena were executed
by a former military unit on December 25, 1989.
AFP - The grim barracks where Romania's brutal communist despot Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife Elena were executed are to be opened to the public in the latest bid to boost "dictator tourism".

The former military unit at Targoviste, 100 kilometres (60 miles) northwest of Bucharest, is to be turned into a museum and is due to welcome its first visitors in early September.

"Many Romanians and foreigners said they wanted to see the wall against which Ceausescu and his wife Elena were shot on December 25, 1989," Ovidiu Carstina, director of the museum, told AFP.

The death of the Ceausescus became one of the defining images of the revolutions which convulsed eastern and central Europe in 1989.

On December 22, as angry crowds gathered in front of the Communist Party headquarters, they fled the capital Bucharest in a helicopter. It was to be their final journey. They were stopped by the army, detained in Targoviste, and shot after a makeshift trial.

It brought to a grisly end more than 20 years of repressive rule aided by a huge security apparatus, where any free speech was ruthlessly suppressed.

The population suffered from food and power shortages and on top of that, Ceascescu's rule was marked by nepotism, paranoia and a deeply ingrained personality cult. Wife Elena was seen as the regime's 'number two'.

"Our aim is to present events as they unfolded, without making comments on the trial, the Ceausescus' life or the cult of personality," said Carstina.


Source: France 24, August 22, 2013

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Witness to death: on murder, and execution, in Alabama

Human Rights: The Inhumane Regime of Iran

We must be honest about the death penalty's repugnance | Opinion

The Unseen Victims of the Death Penalty

California must take the final step by abolishing the death penalty

Following year of delays, is Ohio's death penalty finished?

Iran: Four Prisoners, Including a Woman, Executed

Texas executes Dale Devon Scheanette

Oklahoma: "Solitary confinement amounts to torture"

Iran: ‘Hanging judge’ hears case of outed Iranian Kurdish singer