FEATURED POST

In the crosshairs of conscience: John Kitzhaber's death penalty reckoning

Image
To cope with his dread, John Kitzhaber opened his leather-bound journal and began to write.
It was a little past 9 on the morning of Nov. 22, 2011. Gary Haugen had dropped his appeals. A Marion County judge had signed the murderer's death warrant, leaving Kitzhaber, a former emergency room doctor, to decide Haugen's fate. The 49-year-old would soon die by lethal injection if the governor didn't intervene.
Kitzhaber was exhausted, having been unable to sleep the night before, but he needed to call the families of Haugen's victims.
"I know my decision will delay the closure they need and deserve," he wrote.
The son of University of Oregon English professors, Kitzhaber began writing each day in his journal in the early 1970s. The practice helped him organize his thoughts and, on that particular morning, gather his courage.
Kitzhaber first dialed the widow of David Polin, an inmate Haugen beat and stabbed to death in 2003 while already serving a life sentence fo…

Counseling, Not Crocodiles: Indonesia Anti-Drugs Tsar Flags New Strategy

Crystal meth
Jakarta. Indonesia's new antinarcotics chief Heru Winarko called for an expansion of rehabilitation centers across the country on Wednesday (18/04), flagging a new approach in contrast to the blood-soaked war on drugs underway in its neighbor, the Philippines.

More users, addicts and even minor dealers would be diverted into centers run by medical professionals and counselors rather than heading straight into an over-crowded prison system, Heru told Reuters in an interview.

"With the rehabilitation approach, we cut the demand," he said. "If there is no demand, the supply will not come or reduce."

Heru took over as head of Indonesia's anti-narcotics agency in March, replacing Budi Waseso, a former top police officer who advocated surrounding prisons with moats filled with crocodiles and piranhas to stop drug convicts escaping.

Rather than wildlife, Heru said he planned to set up rehabilitation facilities near prisons.

"It is better if there is a rehabilitation center located close to a prison," he said, noting that a former mental hospital near a correctional facility in Bali was being converted into a center for offenders to tackle addiction.

"When we do it like this, it will be amazing. The prison becomes a place for guiding people."

President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo, has long warned that the country was gripped by a "drugs emergency" amid assertions by officials - challenged by some experts - that there were more than 6 million users.

Jokowi has said drugs posed a bigger danger than Islamist militancy and he intensified a drugs war that has included the execution of drug traffickers, including some foreigners.

Heru said there needed to be rapid growth in assessment centers which determine if drug convicts would benefit from therapy rather than incarceration.

The country’s 127 rehabilitation centers were inadequate for a population of 250 million, and more should be built and existing facilities better integrated, he said.

David McRea, a researcher from the University of Melbourne, said Heru's enthusiasm for rehabilitation needed to be treated cautiously.

Indonesia’s criminal justice system already allowed for some offenders to be rehabilitated but the option was rarely used.

“For years, there’s been talk in Indonesia of a shift to rehabilitate people but people are still being sentenced to prison for petty drug crimes,” he said.

Killings Rise


Methamphetamine, known as shabu, is the most popular drug, according to Heru. More than two tonnes of methamphetamine was seized off the coast of Sumatra island in February in two separate, record busts.

Rodrigo Duterte (left) and Joko Widodo, Jakarta, 2016
Law enforcement officials would maintain their "stern" approach to traffickers and their "shoot to kill" policy if suspects were armed and resisted arrest, said Heru.

But he added Indonesia would not mimic the violent policies of President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines, who was praised by his predecessor, Budi.

"We have our own standard operating procedures," he said.

More than 4,100 people have died during police anti-narcotics operations in the Philippines since July 2016. Another 2,300 have been killed by unidentified gunmen.

Philippines authorities say their actions are lawful and the deaths occur when suspects threaten police.

However, human rights groups and UN officials have accused Philippine anti-drugs agents of extrajudicial killings. Police deny that.

According to Amnesty International, Indonesian police killed 98 drug suspects in 2017, up from 18 the previous year. It said the deaths were rarely investigated.

McRea said the trend of rising drug-related slayings continued in Indonesia this year and was "disturbing."

Source: Jakarta Globe, Reuters, April, 2018


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

New Hampshire: More than 50,000 anti-death penalty signatures delivered to Sununu

Texas: The accused Santa Fe shooter will never get the death penalty. Here’s why.

Texas executes Juan Castillo

Mary Jane Veloso: The woman the firing squad left behind

Five executed in Iran, two hanged in public

The secret executions in Europe's 'last dictatorship'

In the crosshairs of conscience: John Kitzhaber's death penalty reckoning

Collection of items from the career of Britain's most famous executioner discovered

What Indiana officials want to keep secret about executions

China: Appeal of nanny's death penalty sentence wraps up