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Pope Declares Death Penalty Inadmissible in All Cases

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ROME — Pope Francis has declared the death penalty inadmissible in all cases because it is “an attack” on the “dignity of the person,” the Vatican announced on Thursday, in a definitive shift in Roman Catholic teaching that could put enormous pressure on lawmakers and politicians around the world.
Francis, who has spoken out against capital punishment before — including in 2015 in an address to Congress — added the change to the Catechism, the collection of beliefs for the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics.
The revision says the church would work “with determination” for the abolition of capital punishment worldwide.
“I think this will be a big deal for the future of the death penalty in the world,” said John Thavis, a Vatican expert and author. “People who work with prisoners on death row will be thrilled, and I think this will become a banner social justice issue for the church,” he added.
Sergio D’Elia, the secretary of Hands Off Cain, an association that works to abolish capital puni…

Bangladesh seeks death penalty for methamphetamine traffickers

Meth
Bangladesh seized more than 40 million methamphetamine pills in 2017.

DHAKA: Bangladesh wants to punish methamphetamine traffickers with the death penalty, officials said Thursday, as authorities confront the growing popularity of the dangerous and addictive drug.

The proposal to crack down on the spread of methamphetamine comes after Bangladesh seized more than 40 million pills of the narcotic in 2017 – double the previous year.

Authorities want to elevate methamphetamine to a Class A banned substance, meaning traffickers would face the death penalty instead of life behind bars.

Bangladesh law enforcement say the drugs are smuggled across Bangladesh’s border with Myanmar.

Jamaluddin Ahmed, the head of Bangladesh’s narcotics control department, said traffickers had been more active since August, when Rohingya refugees fleeing violence in Myanmar began pouring into Bangladesh.

Gangs had been using the Rohingya as mules and hiding drugs in fishing boats used to ferry the persecuted Muslims to safety.

Raids of fishing boats have uncovered huge hauls of the drug.

Authorities said last week that nine million methamphetamine tablets were seized in less than three months as the refugee influx reached its peak. Nearly two million pills were discovered in a single haul.

Towfique Uddin Ahmed, a director at the narcotics control department, said authorities estimate US$600 million (RM2.3 billion) worth of methamphetamine could be sold on Bangladesh’s streets this year.

One senior official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said “drastic action” like the violent crackdown on drug users and dealers in the Philippines could be needed to stamp out the drug.

“Some (traffickers) should be put in the crosshairs. We have come to that point,” he said.

Source: Agence France-Presse, April 5, 2018


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"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

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