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Iran: The death penalty is an inhumane punishment for death row prisoners, their families and society as a whole

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"Whether guilty or not, the outcome of the death penalty is the same. In Iran, the death penalty is by hanging, and it takes from several agonising seconds to several harrowing minutes for death to occur and for everything to be over."

Every year several hundred people are executed by the Iranian authorities.
According to reports by Iran Human Rights (IHR) and other human rights groups, death row prisoners have often no access to a defence lawyer after their arrest and are sentenced to death following unfair trials and based on confessions extracted from them under torture. 
These are issues which have been addressed in IHR’s previous reports. The current report is based on first-hand accounts of several inmates held in Iran's prisons and their families. The report seeks to illustrate other aspects of how the death penalty affects the inmate, their families and, as a consequence, society.
How does a death row inmate experience his final hours?
Speaking about the final ho…

Bangladesh seeks death penalty for methamphetamine traffickers

Meth
Bangladesh seized more than 40 million methamphetamine pills in 2017.

DHAKA: Bangladesh wants to punish methamphetamine traffickers with the death penalty, officials said Thursday, as authorities confront the growing popularity of the dangerous and addictive drug.

The proposal to crack down on the spread of methamphetamine comes after Bangladesh seized more than 40 million pills of the narcotic in 2017 – double the previous year.

Authorities want to elevate methamphetamine to a Class A banned substance, meaning traffickers would face the death penalty instead of life behind bars.

Bangladesh law enforcement say the drugs are smuggled across Bangladesh’s border with Myanmar.

Jamaluddin Ahmed, the head of Bangladesh’s narcotics control department, said traffickers had been more active since August, when Rohingya refugees fleeing violence in Myanmar began pouring into Bangladesh.

Gangs had been using the Rohingya as mules and hiding drugs in fishing boats used to ferry the persecuted Muslims to safety.

Raids of fishing boats have uncovered huge hauls of the drug.

Authorities said last week that nine million methamphetamine tablets were seized in less than three months as the refugee influx reached its peak. Nearly two million pills were discovered in a single haul.

Towfique Uddin Ahmed, a director at the narcotics control department, said authorities estimate US$600 million (RM2.3 billion) worth of methamphetamine could be sold on Bangladesh’s streets this year.

One senior official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said “drastic action” like the violent crackdown on drug users and dealers in the Philippines could be needed to stamp out the drug.

“Some (traffickers) should be put in the crosshairs. We have come to that point,” he said.

Source: Agence France-Presse, April 5, 2018


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"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

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