FEATURED POST

Iran Execution Trends Six Months After the New Anti-Narcotics Law

Image
IRAN HUMAN RIGHTS (MAY 28, 2018): On Monday, May 10, 2018, Iran Human Rights (IHR) reported the execution of Kiomars Nasouhi, a prisoner sentenced to death for drug offenses. This execution is the first drug-related execution registered by IHR since the latest amendment to the Anti-Narcotics Law was enforced on November 14, 2017.
According to reports by IHR, at least 77 people, among them three juvenile offenders have been executed between January 1. and May 20, 2018. Four were hanged in public spaces. Of the reported executions 62 were sentenced to death for murder, seven for Moharebeh (being an “enemy of God”), seven for rape, and 1 for drug offenses. For comparison, it is reported that during the same period in 2017, at least 203 people were executed, 112 were executed for drug offenses. The significant reduction in the number of executions in 2018 seems to be due to a temporary halt in drug-related executions as the number of executions for murder charges were nearly the same as …

Aceh to stop caning 'criminals' in public: officials

Public caning in Indonesia's Aceh province
Indonesia’s Aceh province will stop caning criminals in public after a wave of international condemnation of the practice, local officials said Thursday.

The conservative region of Sumatra — the only place in Muslim-majority Indonesia allowed to enforce explicitly sharia based laws — passed a regulation Thursday that will see criminals flogged only behind prison walls.

It is not clear when the new rule will come into effect.

Public whippings outside Aceh’s mosques is common punishment for a slew of offenses, ranging from gambling and drinking alcohol to gay sex.

A hooded figure on a makeshift stage rains down lashes, sometimes as many as a hundred strokes, on the back of a grimacing criminal as large crowds of adults and children jeer and scream abuse.

Rights groups have derided it as cruel and last year President Joko Widodo called for an end to public canings in Aceh.

“This (law) is to muffle protest… to muffle Islamophobia,” Aceh governor Irwandi Yusuf said.

“We don’t want Islamophobia to interfere with (Indonesia’s) foreign affairs.”

Around 98 percent of Aceh’s five million residents are Muslims, subject to religious law, including the public whippings which came into practice around 2005.

Crowd enjoying the caning, Aceh, IndonesiaNon-Muslims can usually choose whether or not to be punished under religious law and sometimes choose a painful flogging to avoid a lengthy court process and jail term.

Two Indonesian Christians were flogged in February for playing an arcade game seen as violating Islamic law.

Under the new rules, caning with a rattan stick cannot be recorded anymore — crowds often filmed the spectacle on smartphones — and only journalists and adults can witness the punishment inside prisons.

Some locals, however, were not sold on outlawing public whippings.

“If caning is done in prison… we’re sure there will be more sharia violations in Aceh,” demonstrator Tuwanku Muhammad said at a small protest against the new legislation in the provincial capital Banda Aceh.

“Even now, there are… violations.”

Source: Coconut Jakarta, Agence France-Presse, April 12, 2018


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

After 21 Years on Death Row, Darlie Routier Still Says She's Innocent of Murdering Her Young Sons

Florida seeks death penalty for Miami mom whose baby died from scalding bath

Oklahoma: Death row inmate in Tulsa bank teller's murder found dead at state penitentiary

Alabama prison system sees steep rise in suicides

California: Jury recommends death penalty for serial killer

Kentucky Supreme Court rules death penalty IQ law is unconstitutional

Texas: White supremacist gang members sentenced to death for killing fellow supremacist inmate

Belarus: Unprecedented Supreme Court decision to suspend death sentences

North Carolina: Man’s mental condition, past cited in capital resentencing

Texas: Gustavo Tijerina-Sandoval formally sentenced to death for murder of Border Patrol agent