FEATURED POST

Texas: With a man's execution days away, his victims react with fury or forgiveness

Image
For the past 3 months, Christopher Anthony Young has awoken in his 10-by-6 foot concrete cell on death row and had to remind himself: He's scheduled to die soon.
As the day crept closer, the thought became more constant for Young, who's sentenced to die for killing Hasmukh "Hash" Patel in 2004.
"What will it feel like to lay on the gurney?" he asks himself. "To feel the needle pierce my vein?"
Mitesh Patel, who was 22 when Young murdered his father, has anxiously anticipated those moments, as well. He wonders how he will feel when he files into the room adjacent to the death chamber and sees Young just feet away through a glass wall.
For years, Patel felt a deep hatred for Young. He wanted to see him die. Patel knew it wouldn't bring his father back. But it was part of the process that started 14 years ago when Young, then 21, gunned down Hash Patel during a robbery at Patel's convenience store on the Southeast Side of San Antonio.
3 mont…

Former Texas Prosecutor Withheld Email that Could Have Prevented Innocent Man from Landing on Death Row: Report

Cell
In an announcement late Friday, Harris County, Texas, District Attorney Kim Ogg revealed that a former prosecutor had withheld a key email that could have prevented Alfred Dewayne Brown from receiving the death penalty.

As the Houston Chronicle writes, the email helped establish "a clear alibi" for Brown, who was convicted in a high-profile murder case in 2005 that landed him a death sentence.

Brown always maintained his innocence, and spent nearly 10 years on death row before his case was dismissed in 2015 and his conviction overturned. According the Chronicle, the 36-year-old Brown later sued a slew of Harris County officials, including the DA's office, the prosecutor and police officer who handled the murder case, accusing them of hiding and falsifying evidence against him and violating his constitutional rights to due process and a fair trial.

The new e-mail, which came to light because of Brown's lawsuit, backs up his claims, showing that the prosecutor at the time, Dan Rizzo, was aware of evidence that could exculpate Brown.

Some necessary context: Brown was accused and convicted of killing a Houston police officer and a store clerk during a robbery at a check-cashing store. But Brown maintained that there was no way he could have done the crime since he was at his girlfriend's house at the time of the murders.

And he could prove that he was at his girlfriend's house, Brown said, because he had placed a call to her at work from her house phone during the time of the murders. But as the Chronicle reports, for years, officials claimed they had no record of such a call.

That changed in 2014, when an investigator, Breck McDaniel found phone records in his garage that supported Brown's alibi. The discovery was enough to overturn Brown's death row conviction. At the time, the Chronicle writes, the DA claimed the phone records had simply been "inadvertently misplaced."

The newly released e-mail refutes that claim. A day after Brown's girlfriend testified before a grand jury that Brown had called her from her apartment, McDaniel wrote to then-prosecutor Rizzo about the phone records.

From the Chronicle:

"I was hoping that it would clearly refute Erica's claim that she received a call at work," McDaniel wrote, later continuing: "But, it looks like the call detail records from the apartment shows that the home phone dialed Erica's place of employment on Hartwick Street at about 8:30 a.m. and again at 10:08 a.m."

Rizzo didn't share the evidence with Brown's legal team or the jury - a clear Brady violation.

In light of the evidence, Brown's lawyers want the current Harris County DA, Ogg, to formally declare their client "actually innocent" - a label that would allow Brown to get compensation from the state for his wrongful conviction.

Following his overturned sentence in 2015, Brown petitioned the state for nearly $2 million in compensation for the years he spent on death row, but the request was denied by state officials because he hadn't met the eligibility requirement since Brown was never found "actually innocent."

That phrase ended up pushing Brown to sue Harris County officials for their denial of his due process rights. The civil lawsuit has born certainly borne fruit, without it, the email would have never come out, and the public wouldn't know that not only was Brown actually telling the truth the whole time, but that the real criminals may actually be the Harris County DA's office.

"Vindication," tweeted Brian Stolarz, one of Brown's attorneys when he appealed his criminal case.

"Only now, after a civil lawsuit, does the whole truth finally come out," Stolarz added in a statement, according to the Chronicle. "I am sickened and disheartened, but encouraged that Dewayne is vindicated and his long journey to justice is near the end."

Source: The Root, Anne Branigin, March 4, 2018


⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!



"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Texas: With a man's execution days away, his victims react with fury or forgiveness

Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles rejects clemency for Chris Young

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

Scott Dozier case: Hours before execution, judge in pharma company suit halts use of drug

Alabama: 8 death row inmates request execution by nitrogen gas

Indonesia: Gay couple publicly whipped after vigilante mob drags them out of beauty salon

Fentanyl And The Death Penalty

Utah to seek death penalty for parents charged with killing daughter, covering her in makeup

The Aum Shinrikyo Executions: Why Now?

Sale of guillotine divides France