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Will the U.S. Finally End the Death Penalty?

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In the past, abolition efforts have faced a backlash—but Gavin Newsom’s moratorium may be different.
The American death penalty is extraordinarily fragile, with death sentences and executions on the decline. Public support for the death penalty has diminished. The practice is increasingly marginalized around the world. California, with its disproportionately large share of American death-row inmates, announces an end to the death penalty. The year? 1972. That’s when the California Supreme Court declared the death penalty inconsistent with the state’s constitutional prohibition of cruel or unusual punishments—only to have the death penalty restored a year later through popular initiative and legislation.
On Wednesday, again, California walked back its commitment to the death penalty. Though not full-fledged abolition, Governor Gavin Newsom declared a moratorium on capital punishment lasting as long as his tenure in office, insisting that the California death penalty has been an “abject…

Death penalty for child abduction in Egypt

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Egypt’s parliament approved, Monday, a legislative amendment to toughen penalties against child abduction to death by hanging.

The House of Representatives of Egypt said in a statement it had agreed to “amend a penal code that would impose the death penalty or life imprisonment of 25 years for abducting a child if the abduction was linked with an assault or rape.”

The amendment stipulates that “any child kidnapper who abducts without circumvention or coercion shall be punished by a term of not less than 10 years. If the abduction is accompanied by a ransom request, the penalty shall be imprisonment for a term of no less than 15 years and no more than 20 years.”

The amendment also specifies that “the perpetrator of the abduction crime shall be sentenced to death or life imprisonment if linked with the crime of assaulting the kidnapped or raping him/her.”

The statement quoted the head of the Legislative Committee of the Egyptian House of Representatives, Counselor Bahaa Abu Shoka, as saying that “kidnapping people is a dangerous crime for both humans and society, and affects humanity physically and psychologically as well as it deprives them of liberty.”

He added that “the link of this crime with other crimes is very serious, including murder, theft, and sexual assault. This stimulates the perpetrators’ criminal behaviour through kidnapping to achieve financial and personal gains.”

According to the current law, “Anyone who abducts a child under the age of 16, without circumvention or compulsion, by himself or by others, shall be sentenced to 3 to 10 years’ imprisonment and a crime perpetrator who abducts a female shall be sentenced to life imprisonment if linked with the crime of sexually assaulting the kidnapped.”

According to local media reports, over the past years, Egypt has witnessed a remarkable increase in the spread of the crime of abduction and mainly that of children.

Source: Middle East Monitor, January 9, 2018


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"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed,
but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." -- Oscar Wilde

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