FEATURED POST

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Image
The fire moved quickly through the house, a one-story wood-frame structure in a working-class neighborhood of Corsicana, in northeast Texas. Flames spread along the walls, bursting through doorways, blistering paint and tiles and furniture. Smoke pressed against the ceiling, then banked downward, seeping into each room and through crevices in the windows, staining the morning sky.
Buffie Barbee, who was eleven years old and lived two houses down, was playing in her back yard when she smelled the smoke. She ran inside and told her mother, Diane, and they hurried up the street; that’s when they saw the smoldering house and Cameron Todd Willingham standing on the front porch, wearing only a pair of jeans, his chest blackened with soot, his hair and eyelids singed. He was screaming, “My babies are burning up!” His children—Karmon and Kameron, who were one-year-old twin girls, and two-year-old Amber—were trapped inside.
Willingham told the Barbees to call the Fire Department, and while Dia…

Iran: MPs Urge Judiciary to Halt Executions for Minor Drug Convictions Until Death Penalty Law is Amended

Iran flag
The Iranian Parliament's Legal and Judicial Affairs Committee is calling on the judiciary to halt executions of prisoners convicted of petty drug offenses until a pending amendment to the law that could save thousands of prisoners on death row is passed.

"We expect the amendment to the Law Against Drug Trafficking will pass with a high number of votes because the majority of MPs are in favor of it," said the committee's Deputy Chairman Mohammad Kazemi during an interview with Shargh newspaper on July 5, 2017.

"Until the amendment's final ratification, the lives of some prisoners will be in the balance," he added. "Their lives could be spared when the [new] law is applied retroactively. For this reason, we have requested the judicial branch to halt these executions."

Iran has one of the highest per-capita execution rates in the world. At least 567 people were executed in 2016, down 42 % from the 977 who were in executed in 2015. The vast majority of executions were for petty drug-trafficking crimes, including for carrying small amounts of illegal drugs.

A proposal that could dramatically reduce execution rates for drug-related crimes has been floating in Iran's legislature since 2015. A final vote scheduled on June 7, 2017 was postponed until after the summer recess in mid-July after anonymous "security and government agencies" requested a delay.


Revised law could save 5,000 on death row


If approved by Parliament and the Guardian Council, the revised law could save the lives of up to 5,000 prisoners on death row in Iran for drug-trafficking and related crimes. The new law would make the death penalty only applicable for "organized drug lords," "armed traffickers," "repeat offenders" and "bulk drug distributors."

According to Deputy Chairman Kazemi, the Legal and Judicial Affairs Committee is currently working on last minute changes in response to complaints from the judiciary that the amendment should be clearer on what quantity of drugs constitutes trafficking.

Mohammad Ali Pourmokhtar, another member of the committee, told Shargh he was certain the amendment would be passed, but until then, "it needs to be hammered out a bit."

Many judicial authorities have opposed limits on the death penalty, claiming such an action would weaken Iran's resolve in the fight against the country's growing drug crisis.

The latest opposition came from the head of the prosecutor's office in Khorasan Razavi Province, Ali Mozaffari, who accused Parliament of trying to appease Western governments that have criticized Iran's high rate of executions.

"The Western governments will not stop their animosity towards the Islamic Republic of Iran even if you make a thousand changes to the law," said Mozaffari at a drug enforcement conference in Mashhad on July 5.

"The death penalty for drug crimes is on the basis of punishments for 'Corruption on Earth' commanded by the Quran and Islamic law," he added. "It is in the interest of human society."

General Mohammad Masoud Zahedian, the head of the Anti-Drug Police Force, also told the conference he was opposed to the proposed amendment.

"Eliminating the death penalty for drug criminals is not going to be beneficial," he said. "It will cause some problems."

Some of the amendment's supporters responded that the death penalty will not be completely eliminated as an option in the fight against drug trafficking.

"The proposal does not remove capital punishment entirely," said MP Pourmokhtar. "Instead our emphasis is on eliminating excessive punishments that victimize small-time dealers rather than major traffickers."

No deterrence


Some conservatives have conceded that the death penalty has failed as a preventative measure against drug trafficking.

"We are looking to see what punishments can replace executions with greater effectiveness for certain criminals," said Justice Minister Mostafa Pourmohammadi on October 29, 2016.

"Of course, the death penalty will still be enforced, but not to the extent we have today," he added.

On the other hand, Judiciary Chief Sadegh Larijani has not only opposed reducing the death penalty for drug crimes, he has also asked judges to expedite execution orders.

"We don't think that the laws concerning drug trafficking are revelations from God," said Larijani on September 29, 2016. "They are man-made laws that have not had perfect results. But it's wrong to say that executions have had no effect."

"If the judiciary had not been strict, we would have been in a far worse situation," he added.


2 Prisoners Hanged on Murder Charges


2 prisoners were reportedly hanged at Maragheh Prison (East Azerbaijan province, northwestern Iran) on murder charges. 

Close sources say the executions were carried out on the morning of Wednesday July 5. 

Iran Human Rights has obtained the identities of these prisoners: Hojat Imani, 34 years of age, and Jafar Seyed Rasouli, 36 years of age. 

These two prisoners were reportedly among a group of four who transferred to solitary confinement on Monday July 3 in preparation for their executions. 

The other 2 prisoners, Ali Siadat and Soleiman Shahsavari, were reportedly returned to their cells after their execution sentences were postponed by the complainants in their cases. 

Iranian official sources, including the Judiciary and the media, have not announced these 2 executions. 


Source: Iran Human Rights, July 8, 2017

⚑ | Report an error, an omission, a typo; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; submit a piece, a comment; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!

Comments

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

Nevada law says chief medical officer must advise on executions despite ethical clash

Trial by Fire - Did Texas execute an innocent man?

Iran: Prisoners Hanged in Public While Crowd Watched

20 Minutes to Death: Record of the Last Execution in France

Poorly executed - Indiana inmate challenges state's lethal cocktail change

Arkansas death-row inmate tries to drop appeal blocking execution; request denied

Russian who joined ISIS in Iraq sentenced to hanging

Iran: More Public Executions, Prisoner Hanged While Crowd Watched

"I cannot execute convicted murderers," Tanzania's president declares

Patrick Henry, French child murderer in famous case, to be released