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No Second Chances: What to Do After a Botched Execution

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Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. The state shouldn't get a second chance.
The pathos and problems of America's death penalty were vividly on display yesterday when Ohio tried and failed to execute Alva Campbell. Immediately after its failure Gov. John Kasich set June 5, 2019, as a new execution date.
This plan for a second execution reveals a glaring inadequacy in the legal standards governing botched executions in the United States.
Campbell was tried and sentenced to die for murdering 18-year-old Charles Dials during a carjacking in 1997. After Campbell exhausted his legal appeals, he was denied clemency by the state parole board and the governor.
By the time the state got around to executing Campbell, he was far from the dangerous criminal of 20 years ago. As is the case with many of America's death-row inmates, the passage of time had inflicted its own punishments.
The inmate Ohio strapped onto the gurney was a 69-year-old man afflicted with serious ailm…

Arkansas’ multiple execution plan in limbo after rulings

Death-penalty opponents on the front steps of Arkansas' Capitol to protest the state's plan to execute seven inmates before the end of April.
Death-penalty opponents on the front steps of Arkansas' Capitol to protest
the state's plan to execute seven inmates before the end of April.
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Arkansas’ push to resume executions after nearly 12 years with an already compromised plan to put eight men to death over 11 days is in limbo after a judge blocked the use of a lethal injection drug a supplier says officials misleadingly obtained and the state’s highest court halted the execution of one of the first inmates who had been scheduled to die.

A federal judge could further upend the plans, with a possible ruling on Saturday on whether to halt the executions over the inmates’ complaints about the compressed timetable and the use of a controversial sedative in the lethal injections.

Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen issued a temporary restraining order Friday blocking the state from using its supply of vecuronium bromide after a company said it had sold the drug to the state for medical purposes, not capital punishment. Griffen scheduled a hearing Tuesday, the day after the first execution was scheduled.

Griffen’s order effectively halts the executions, which had dropped to six after the state Supreme Court blocked one execution Friday and a federal judge halting another last week, unless it’s reversed or the state finds a new supply of the drug.

Arkansas, which has not executed an inmate since 2005 because of drug shortages and legal challenges, had initially planned to execute eight before the end of April, when its supply of midazolam expires. That plan, if carried out, would have marked the most inmates executed by a state in such a short period since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976.

“The rulings today are just part of the process and not unexpected,” J.R. Davis, a spokesman for Gov. Asa Hutchinson, said in a statement. “The Governor will meet with the Attorney General next week to discuss the appropriate action.”

Attorney General Leslie Rutledge’s office said she planned to file an emergency request with the state Supreme Court to vacate Griffen’s order, saying Griffen shouldn’t handle the case. Local media outlets had tweeted photos and video of Griffen appearing to mimic an inmate strapped to a gurney at an anti-death penalty demonstration outside the Governor’s Mansion Friday afternoon.

“As a public opponent of capital punishment, Judge Griffen should have recused himself from this case,” Rutledge spokesman Judd Deere said.

The order came the same day justices issued a stay for Bruce Ward, who was scheduled to be put to death on Monday night for the 1989 death of a woman found strangled in the men’s room of the Little Rock convenience store where she worked. Attorneys asked for the stay after a Jefferson County judge said she didn’t have the authority to halt Ward’s execution. Ward’s attorneys have argued he is a diagnosed schizophrenic with no rational understanding of his impending execution.

“We are grateful that the Arkansas Supreme Court has issued a stay of execution for Bruce Ward so that they may consider the serious questions presented about his sanity,” Scott Braden, an assistant federal public defender representing Ward, said in a statement.

U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker is also considering the inmates’ arguments that such a compressed schedule could lead to undue pain and suffering. Baker had not ruled by Friday evening.

McKesson said it had requested Arkansas return its supply of vecuronium bromide after the San Francisco-based company learned it would be used in executions. The firm said Thursday night the state had assured it would return the drug and the company had even issued a refund, but it never was given back. The company accused the Department of Correction of misleadingly using its medical director’s license, which was to be used only to order products for “legitimate medical uses,” to buy the drug.

“Without the medical license, and the associated tacit representation that the controlled drug would only be used for a legitimate medical purpose, McKesson would not have sold the vecuronium to ADC,” the company said in its lawsuit.

Under Arkansas’ protocol, midazolam is used to sedate the inmate, vecuronium bromide then stops the inmate’s breathing and potassium chloride stops the heart.

Baker is also considering a request from two pharmaceutical companies that their products not be used for capital punishment. Fresenius Kabi USA and West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp. have asked the court to prohibit Arkansas from using their drugs.

Source: The Associated Press, Andrew Demillo, April 15, 2017

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