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2018 Death Penalty report: Saudi Arabia’s False Promise

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With crown prince Mohammed bin Salman at the helm, 2018 was a deeply violent and barbaric year for Saudi Arabia, under his de facto leadership.
PhotoDeera Square is a public space located in front of the Religious Police building in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in which public executions (usually by beheading) take place. It is sometimes known as Justice Square and colloquially called Chop Chop Square. After Friday prayers, police and other officials clear the area to make way for the execution to take place. After the beheading of the condemned, the head is stitched to the body which is wrapped up and taken away for the final rites.
This year execution rates of 149 executions, shows an increase from the previous year of three executions, indicating that death penalty trends are soaring and there is no reversal of this trend in sight.
The execution rates between 2015-2018 are amongst the highest recorded in the Kingdom since the 1990s and coincide with the ascension of king Salman to the t…

Japan: Court upholds acquittal for man sentenced to death for arson-murders

OSAKA — The Osaka High Court has upheld a lower court decision that acquitted a man who had previously been sentenced to death for murdering his daughter-in-law and her son before setting fire to their apartment in Osaka in 2002.

Takemitsu Mori, a 59-year-old prison guard on administrative leave, was acquitted by the Osaka District Court in March 2012 after the Supreme Court ordered a retrial by repealing a high court decision that sentenced him to death, a rare decision by the country’s highest court.

The focus of the case was what to make of circumstantial evidence presented by prosecutors, while the defendant consistently denied the charges, saying he had never entered the apartment of the woman and her son.

Presiding Judge Shinichiro Fukuzaki rejected the prosecutor’s claim that Mori has been to the apartment because he knew the location of furniture in their apartment. The judge said the defendant could have assumed the room arrangement from conversations with his family after the incident.

Mori was arrested in November 2002, seven months after Mayumi Mori, 28, and her 1-year-old son Toma were found dead in their apartment in Osaka’s Hirano Ward on April 14 that year. The woman was found strangled and her son drowned.

In April 2010, the Supreme Court rejected both the life sentence handed down by a district court and the death penalty by a high court, judging it necessary to see facts that can only be explained if the defendant had in fact committed the crime.

Following the Supreme Court ruling, the Osaka District Court found Mori not guilty, saying there was no evidence that proved the defendant had entered the apartment on the day of the incident.

In the latest examination at the high court, a DNA analysis of a dog harness, claimed by prosecutors to be the murder weapon, was conducted but did not find any link to Mori.

The prosecutors requested a review of the lower court’s acquittal as saliva found on a cigarette butt discovered in a staircase at the apartment matched Mori’s DNA and an eyewitness saw a car of the same type and color as Mori’s near the apartment.

The defense counsel asked the court to reject the appeal, arguing that the court was presented with no credible evidence showing that the cigarette butt was discarded on the day of the incident.

Source: Japan Today, March 3, 2017

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