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Why Texas’ ‘death penalty capital of the world’ stopped executing people

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Since the Supreme Court legalized capital punishment in 1976, Harris County, Texas, has executed 126 people. That's more executions than every individual state in the union, barring Texas itself.
Harris County's executions account for 23 percent of the 545 people Texas has executed. On the national level, the state alone is responsible for more than a third of the 1,465 people put to death in the United States since 1976.
In 2017, however, the county known as the "death penalty capital of the world" and the "buckle of the American death belt" executed and sentenced to death a remarkable number of people: zero.
This is the first time since 1985 that Harris County did not execute any of its death row inmates, and the third year in a row it did not sentence anyone to capital punishment either.
The remarkable statistic reflects a shift the nation is seeing as a whole.
“The practices that the Harris County District Attorney’s Office is following are also signifi…

Pakistan says it ‘may limit’ death penalty, amid fears for mentally ill prisoner

Pakistan says it is seeking ways to limit the scope of the death penalty, amid fears for a mentally ill prisoner who faces hanging as early as next week.

Speaking on Monday at an event at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva, the first secretary of Pakistan’s Permanent Mission to the UN said the government was examining the country’s penal code to determine whether the death penalty could be “narrowed”, saying: “We are looking at the option of enhancing the duration of life sentence instead of awarding death sentences.” She added: “Pakistan remains fully committed to promoting and protecting the human rights of all our citizens.”

Pakistan has executed some 419 people since the lifting of a moratorium on the death penalty in December 2014, making it one of the world’s most prolific executing states. Research last year by Reuters and human rights organization Reprieve found that – despite a claim by the Pakistani government to be targeting ‘terrorists’ – fewer than one in six of those prisoners who had been hanged could be linked to militancy.

Among those currently facing execution is Imdad Ali, a former electrician who is severely mentally ill. Yesterday, Pakistan’s Supreme Court dismissed an appeal by Mr Ali to stop his hanging, which had been scheduled to take place last week. Ruling that Imdad’s execution could go ahead, the Court said that a large proportion of prisoners in Pakistan suffer from mental illness and that they “cannot let everyone go.” He could now be hanged as early as next week, despite a prison medical report from earlier this month describing him as “insane.”

The execution of mentally ill people is prohibited under Pakistani and international law. Yesterday, several UN human rights experts urged Pakistan to halt Mr Ali’s execution, while Amnesty International and the Asian Human Rights Commission have also called for the hanging to be stopped.

Commenting, Harriet McCulloch, deputy director of the death penalty team at Reprieve, said: “While it’s encouraging to hear that Pakistan’s government may finally be turning away from its recent shameful spree of executions, the authorities must act now to prevent another illegal hanging. Imdad Ali could be executed within days, despite the government’s own doctors having declared him ‘insane’ – his hanging would be a grave breach of Pakistani and international law. If Pakistan’s leaders are serious about scaling back the death penalty, they must start right away, and call off Imdad’s execution.”

Source: Reprieve, septemebr 28, 2016. Reprieve is an international human rights organization. Reprieve’s London office can be contacted on: communications@reprieve.org.uk. Reprieve US, based in New York City, can be contacted on Katherine.oshea@reprieve.org 

More detail on the comments made at yesterday's UNHRC event is available on request.

A statement by four UN rights experts, made yesterday, can be seen here; Amnesty International's comments can be seen here; while the Asian Human Rights Commission's comments are here.

4. Reuters' 2015 piece on executions in Pakistan can be seen here.

5. More information about Imdad Ali is available at the Reprieve website.

Emergency Action: Prisoner under new threat of execution


Imdad Ali suffers from such severe paranoid schizophrenia that he isn’t even aware that he could be executed as early as next week.

Imdad did not receive a proper medical assessment at his trial and was sentenced to death without his mental illness being properly considered. Despite now conceding that he is mentally ill, the Pakistan Supreme Court yesterday refused to stop his execution.

Last week, we helped to launch legal action in Pakistan and built an international campaign signed by over 10,000 Reprieve supporters. His execution was halted with only hours to spare – but now that the Pakistan Supreme Court has rejected his appeal, he could receive a new death warrant at any time.

Imdad's legal options have now been exhausted and his only chance is clemency from President Hussain of Pakistan. Will you call on President Hussain to grant mercy to Imdad and prevent his inhumane execution?


Time is against us, and we have to act quickly. On Friday, we will present our petition to the Pakistan High Commission in London to show the authorities how many people around the world oppose what they're planning. Please add your name to our call for mercy, and help us prevent the execution of a vulnerable, severely mentally ill man.

Source: Clive Stafford Smith, Founder, Reprieve

⚑ | Report an error, an omission; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; send a submission; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


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