FEATURED POST

Why Texas’ ‘death penalty capital of the world’ stopped executing people

Image
Since the Supreme Court legalized capital punishment in 1976, Harris County, Texas, has executed 126 people. That's more executions than every individual state in the union, barring Texas itself.
Harris County's executions account for 23 percent of the 545 people Texas has executed. On the national level, the state alone is responsible for more than a third of the 1,465 people put to death in the United States since 1976.
In 2017, however, the county known as the "death penalty capital of the world" and the "buckle of the American death belt" executed and sentenced to death a remarkable number of people: zero.
This is the first time since 1985 that Harris County did not execute any of its death row inmates, and the third year in a row it did not sentence anyone to capital punishment either.
The remarkable statistic reflects a shift the nation is seeing as a whole.
“The practices that the Harris County District Attorney’s Office is following are also signifi…

Despite executions, Bali still Australians' #2 holiday destination; Singapore ranks 4th

Bienvenue à Bali
Welcome to Bali
The most searched for destination: Traveller names 10 most popular destinations according to readers

This week marks the second anniversary of the launch of Traveller.com.au and the past two years has seen Australia's leading online travel publishing site go from strength to strength. 

But what are Traveller's readers really interested in? We did some analysis to find out which destinations were our most popular with readers over the past two years and the answers might surprise you. 

Based on the destinations most searched for on the site, the No.1 place Traveller readers were seeking information and inspiration for was Japan. The Land of the Rising Sun has become increasingly popular with Australians in recent years, as we seek to experience new Asian destinations beyond the traditional hotspots in south-east Asia. 

Which is not to say that south-east Asia was not popular too. The No.2 destination was the traditional Australian favourite of Bali. And despite some bad publicity in recent years over several incidents involving Australians (including calls for a boycott of the destination after the execution of two of the Bali Nine drug smugglers), we have continued to flock to the Indonesian island in droves. 

Further from home, New York came in at No.3. The Big Apple has always drawn plenty of Australians, with increasing numbers of Aussies choosing to relocate there. Despite our dollar losing almost 20 per cent of its value against the US over the past two years, Australians remain keen to visit the US and New York is the first city of choice.

Perennial stopover favourite Singapore came in at No.4, and while Qantas may have now have bypassed the city on its "Kangaroo Route" to Europe in favour of Dubai, it's still a popular spot for stopovers for Australians travelling with other carriers to Europe and elsewhere.

Click here to read the full article

Source: traveller.com, Craig Platt, September 16, 2016

⚑ | Report an error, an omission; suggest a story or a new angle to an existing story; send a submission; recommend a resource; contact the webmaster, contact us: deathpenaltynews@gmail.com.


Opposed to Capital Punishment? Help us keep this blog up and running! DONATE!

Most Viewed (Last 7 Days)

North Carolina death row becoming frail, aging

Trump calls for death penalty for anyone who kills a police officer

California: Riverside County leads U.S. in death penalty sentences, but hasn’t executed anyone in 39 years

Bali jailbreak: US inmate escapes notorious Kerobokan prison

Why Texas’ ‘death penalty capital of the world’ stopped executing people

Georgia executes Emmanuel Hammond

Law of Parties: Prosecutor who put Jeff Wood on Texas’ death row asks for clemency

China sentences ten to death in front of cheering crowd of thousands

Iran: Two Prisoners Hanged In Public

California: Death penalty for the man who killed an 8-year-old he thought was gay