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To beat the clock on the expiration of its lethal injection drug supply, this past April, Arkansas tried to execute 8 men over 1 days. The stories told in frantic legal filings and clemency petitions revealed a deeply disturbing picture. Ledell Lee may have had an intellectual disability that rendered him constitutionally ineligible for the death penalty, but he had a spate of bad lawyers who failed to timely present evidence of this claim -…

Erdoğan: I will approve death penalty if parliament votes

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan told a rally of millions of people in Istanbul on Aug. 7 that he would approve the death penalty if parliament voted for it, following last month's failed coup.

Erdoğan started his speech at the "Democracy and Martyrs' Rally” against the July 15 coup attempt by thanking the people who stood against the tanks and planes used by the coup plotters.

He wished his condolences to the 240 people killed by coup soldiers, of whom 172 were civilians, 63 were police officers and five were soldiers. He also wished speedy recovery to the 2,195 wounded.

During Erdoğan’s speech the crowd repeatedly shouted that they wanted death penalty to be reintroduced.

“If the parliament accepts the reintroduction of death penalty, I will accept it,” he told the crowd, adding that the death penalty exists in the U.S., Japan and “many other countries.”

“If the people want death penalty, I think the political parties will also accept it,” he also said, as he noted that the death penalty existed until 1984 in Turkey.

Erdoğan said the network of U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gülen, who is blamed for the coup attempt three weeks ago, must be destroyed within the framework of the law.

Saying that the people showed that they won’t accept slavery on the night of the failed coup bid, Erdoğan added that Gülen movement calculated many mischiefs, but couldn’t take the people into account.

“Night of July 15 coup bid showed this country cannot be undone,” Erdoğan said.

“Our presence today upsets our enemies just like it did on the morning of July 16,” he said.

Source: Hurriyet, August 7, 2016

Erdogan renews death penalty call amid Austria war of word


Turkish soldiers
Turkey's president has renewed calls to reintroduce the death penalty amid a growing spat with Austria over EU membership.

Some 1 million people on Sunday (7 August) in Istanbul rallied in support of Turkey's government following last month's failed military coup.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Turkey's president, told the so-called “democracy and martyrs” rally he would back capital punishment should the public and parliament approve it.

"It is the Turkish parliament that will decide on the death penalty... I declare it in advance, I will approve the decision made by the parliament," he said.

But this brings into doubt what a senior Turkish MP from the ruling government party told EUobserver last week, that the death penalty was not on the table.

"It is not on our agenda at the moment, it is not on the agenda of the parliament," said Sena Nur Celik, an MP from the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) during a visit to Brussels.

Celik said "emotions are very high" over the issue given the almost 240 people killed and over 2,000 injured during the July 15 coup attempt.

Turkey abolished the death penalty in 2004 as part of a bid to join the European Union.

Any reintroduction would put an end to talks and further cloud a migrant swap deal signed with Ankara in March. Part of that deal included accelerating membership talks by opening Chapter 33 on budgetary issues.

Turkey's accession talks kicked off in 2005; but, only 1 of 35 chapters has so far been concluded.

The deal also promised to lift short stay visa restrictions on Turks should Ankara meet outstanding requirements imposed by the EU.

Death threats for Austria

But any prospect of Turkey's bid to become an EU member, regardless of Erdogan's death penalty, appears increasingly dim.

Austria's foreign minister Sebastian Kurz on Friday threatened to scupper expansion talks with Turkey.

"I have a seat and a vote in the [EU] foreign ministers' council. There the question is whether new negotiation chapters will be opened with Turkey, and I am against it," he said in an interview with Austrian daily Kurier.

Kurz also said the criteria for visa liberalisation "will not be fulfilled by Turkey."

Kurz's comments follows similar calls by Austria's chancellor Christian Kern.

The chancellor said he would start discussions among other EU states to put an end to accession talks, given the democratic rollback in Turkey.

Kern has since received death threats, reports AFP.

"Threats, even death threats, from the right wing and the radical part of the Turkish community have become reality for me,” he is quoted as saying in Osterreich daily.

Turkish foreign minster Mevlut Cavusoglu also shot back on Kern.

On Friday, he called Austria the "capital of radical racism", saying Kern should keep to his own affairs.

The purge in Turkey against people affiliated with the outlawed Fethullah Gulen group continues.

Turkey's government says Gulen, a Muslim cleric who has lived in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania since 1991, is the mastermind behind the coup, a charge he denies.

Some 70,000 people have so far been sacked, arrested or detained since mid-July.

Erdogan, for his part, has promised to drop lawsuits against some 2,000 people who had insulted him.

The move is seen by critics as part of a government-led effort to create a new narrative for Turkey with Erdogan at its centre.

Russian news agency TASS reports that Erdogan will visit St Petersburg, on Tuesday, to smooth over ties with the Russian government.

Erdogan said his planned visit will "mark new page in bilateral relations" between the two nations after Turkey downed a Russian jet fighter last November.

Source: Eurobserver, Nikolaj Nielsen, August 8, 2016

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"One is absolutely sickened, not by the crimes that the wicked have committed, but by the punishments that the good have inflicted." - Oscar Wilde

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